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    Less Competition, More Talent: Here’s How to Recruit in an Economic Downturn

    What You’ll Learn

    How a ‘down’ economy affects hiring strategiesWhat companies should avoid doing in rough economies (it’s probably not what you think)Advantages of recruiting in an economic downturn12 best practices to help gain a competitive advantage when the economy slows

    About this eBook

    If you’re in the hiring space, you’re probably no stranger to this shifting landscape of talent acquisition. Now, we’re facing the newest challenge in the labor market: rising inflation, fears of recession, and labor shortages. But no matter the economic climate, it’s your job to find and retain top tech talent. Discover how can you adapt your hiring strategy to successfully recruit, keep pipelines warm (and strengthen your own career) during an economic downturn. More

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    Get Internal Approval for Recruiting Tools: A Step-by-Step Playbook

    What You’ll Learn

    How to articulate the problem the tool will solve (with examples!)How to prepare a solid rebuttal (just in case)The communication structure to follow when you request the tool

    About this eBook

    Your team has big goals and you’ve identified a new recruiting tool to help. So what’s the best strategy to get it approved internally? Securing approval may feel like a tremendous challenge but this playbook will outline, step by step, how to get your recruitment tool budget approved so you can better automate and streamline your hiring process. More

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    8 Ways to Hire Faster & Build a Better Employer Brand

    What You’ll Learn

    How to fill positions more efficiently through tools, templates, and moreThe partnership making hires an average of 11 days fasterThe strategy that took an offer acceptance rate from 60% to 88%

    About this eBook, 8 Ways to Hire Faster & Build a Better Employer Brand

    In a panel discussion led by Hired CTO Dave Walters, talent leaders from Gem, Tanium, NBCUniversal, and One Medical shared their thoughts on trends and best practices for optimizing the candidate experience.

    They reviewed how to improve the hiring process by strengthening the experience and by extension, the employer brand. Now, we are covering eight of their strategies to consistently help their teams fill tech and sales jobs efficiently. Use them to take action with your recruiting goals! More

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    2022 Survey Results: Top 3 Benefits Ranked by Engineers (Besides Salary)

    Last year was largely characterized by the Great Resignation but this year, in 2022, both employers and employees face uncertainty in the hiring market. This challenges employers to be more efficient when attracting, hiring, and onboarding new tech employees. To help you be more competitive when sourcing top talent, Hired’s 2022 State of Tech Salaries report reveals the three benefits ranked highest by engineers.

    Analyzing data from more than 907,000 interview requests across over 47,750 active positions, the process revealed insights from top tech talent and what they want in potential employers. 

    Potential candidates strongly factor benefits into their decision so this is important to your retention efforts with current employees. 

    Incorporate The Top Three Benefits in Your Recruiting Strategy 

    Hired’s 2022 State of Tech Salaries Report revealed engineers rank three benefits as most important to their job search outside of base compensation: flexible schedule, PTO, and physical health benefits. Are you an employer, recruiter, or hiring manager? Prioritize these benefits for robust recruiting and talent retention strategies and efforts. 

    1. Flexible Work Schedule 

    The pandemic forced companies to jump into remote work head first. However, as we adapt to the future of work, Hired found employees aren’t interested in fully returning to the office. Take a look at the response to our WFH questions. We found only 2% considered an in-office workplace most ideal. While over half (54.2%) would be willing to go back to the office if it came with more job security, they also reported they would search for other jobs with flexible remote work options right away.

    Note the flexible option to work from home is now the bare minimum. You need a comprehensive flexible work schedule. Here are a few trending best practices to consider implementing and promoting: 

    Shortened Work Week 

    Many companies are testing adaptable schedules, such as shortened work weeks. This model makes sense, especially for tech roles unnecessarily tied to the traditional, Monday-Friday, 9-5 work week. Companies adapting to a 4-day model see increased productivity and better work-life balance. 

    Family-Friendly Workplace 

    The pandemic also shined a light on the specific challenges faced by caregivers. For working parents or those caring for aging adults, it was overdue. It humanized a lot of working relationships and often provided a bit of levity. How many kids and dogs have you seen on video calls?

    As a result, reports found 57% of senior leaders plan to prioritize care benefits. When promoting flexible scheduling options, emphasize families may work around their responsibilities. Remember to be inclusive. Flexible scheduling isn’t only for working parents. Think of those who are in the “sandwich generation” or taking care of partners/parents. 

    2. Clear PTO Policies 

    First, it’s best to define your PTO policy. You won’t get far with candidates with vague mentions of “generous PTO.” What does that mean? Generous to whom? It’s all relative. Instead, clearly outline policies in your job postings. 

    Remember, asking employees to categorize their paid time off requests is passé. A solid and robust PTO strategy combines days for vacation, sick time, bereavement, and personal time in a single bank for employee use — no explanations for their use needed.

    Another hot-button topic for benefits is the debate over unlimited PTO. There are pros and cons to its implementation:

    Cons of Unlimited PTO

    Ambiguity actually makes employees take less time off. Branka Vuleta, founder of LegalJobs.io, explains: “In reality, people who have an opportunity to take as many vacations as they can end up taking fewer days off than those with a limited amount of days off in a year.

    In a nutshell, the unlimited PTO policy is a marketing trick supposed to lure people into applying for the job.” Employees new to unlimited PTO may not understand it’s not accrued, and therefore, isn’t paid out if they leave.

    Pros of Unlimited PTO

    Allows employees to take time off at their discretion and puts no caps on the number of days or hours used. This respects employees as adults instead of kids with a hall pass. This empowerment can be an attractive recruiting tool in a competitive marketplace.

    Employee Communication Guidance

    No matter what you decide, the key is to disclose as much insight into your PTO policy as possible. The last two decades of the tech revolution coupled with the pandemic created a more fluid and open-minded environment. 

    Prospective and current employees still want to understand, however, how and when they can take time off, and what the policy will mean to them. Consider mentioning:

    Required PTO minimums: Explain how your company requires workers to take time off to avoid burnout. Assistance with PTO coverage: This is often an issue with the unlimited PTO policies. People can take off as much time as they want, but covering ongoing projects, deliverables, and duties is cumbersome. Have company leadership take this burden off employees’ shoulders and be sure to communicate this in your job posting. People-first strategy: Showcase your first priority is employee morale, mental wellness, and as much work-life balance as possible. 

    3. Physical Health Benefits

    Healthcare in the U.S. is more expensive than ever. Combined with the painful lessons of the pandemic, employees are more aware of the importance of physical health and wellness.

    So, health benefits play an integral role in recruiting and retaining employees. In addition, study after study proves healthier employees are happier and more productive — benefiting employers and their bottom line.

    Physical health benefits include medical, dental, mental wellness, vision, and other benefits relating to healthcare. But it doesn’t stop there. While it’s imperative to list your complete health benefits offerings, be creative when it comes to wellness coverage and perks. Use these innovative companies and ideas as inspiration:

    Platforms like Modern Health allow employees to enjoy a full spectrum of mental and physical health benefits via one app. Companies like Accenture provide confidential employee assistance programs with training and resources to help with stress, mental health, or substance abuse.A fitness reimbursement program can offer financial assistance for gym memberships, virtual exercise classes, or even personal trainers. For instance, Microsoft offers “$1,200 per year for employee-only wellness-related expenses that help you get and stay fit physically, emotionally, and financially.”  

    Refer to this exhaustive list of perks and stipends for more examples.  

    Want to Attract and Retain Tech Talent? Promote the Right Benefits 

    Competing for tech talent in this current hiring climate and job market may feel like a herculean task, but it doesn’t have to be. Just adapt your strategies to meet evolving expectations surrounding work-life balance, remote work, and other benefits. The good news is the work to make these shifts benefits your current team members and retention efforts, too.

    Remember to emphasize your attractive benefits (specifically flexible schedules, PTO, and health benefits) on your careers page, job postings, and even social media. Shout about them everywhere. Quantify and qualify them to put it into context for prospective candidates. Consider asking current team members to participate in testimonials, quotes, or case studies. 

    This is a difficult time, but you don’t have to go through it alone. Hired’s platform allows you to highlight benefits in your company profile and helps ensure they’re communicated to candidates (i.e., in email requests to interview).

    Hired also gives you access to ongoing real-time market data to tailor your outreach and optimize response rates. This ultimately saves HR teams time to focus on higher-level tasks like retention via employee experience.  

    Top Benefits Ranked by Survey Respondents

    Get even more details about what tech professionals like engineers want regarding salaries, benefits, remote work flexibility, and more.

    Related 

    Tracy Ring is a freelance writer and content marketer. She brings a real-life perspective to her writing from 10+ years of diverse experience, including HR, project management, customer and client relations, and admin roles. Connect with her on LinkedIn or Twitter. More

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    What Happens When TA & Hiring Managers Unite? Best Practices from Walmart, One Medical & More

    Strategies for SMB, MM & Enterprise

    Key Takeaways

    Traditional hiring practices of SMBs, MM, and Enterprise level employersHired’s recommendations for each business sizeSpecific examples of tactics and strategies from talent leaders

    About the eBook:

    A common thread we’ve seen with some of our top employers on Hired is engagement with candidates from both TA and hiring management teams. In this piece, we’ll show how some companies are achieving new heights by inviting both groups to collaborate on the platform and in the process.

    In this robust ebook, we’ll also take a detailed look at how enterprise, mid-market, and SMB employers approach hiring talent, share our best practices for each, and how companies such as Walmart Global Tech, Smartsheet, One Medical, Tanium, NBCUniversal, Gem, Mercari, and more increased acceptance rates and sped up time to hire. In some cases, 11 days faster than the benchmark! More

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    Diversity Isn’t Optional: How 3 Talent Leaders Made DEI an Organizational Imperative

    All too often, organizations treat DEI initiatives as optional—but this approach couldn’t be worse for business.  

    According to McKinsey, gender-diverse companies are 15% more likely to have financial returns above their national industry median and ethnically diverse companies typically experience a 35% increase in performance compared to homogenous competitors. Similarly, a Boston Consulting Group report found diverse management teams generate 19 times more revenue than non-diverse teams.

    The statistics speak for themselves: diversity is key to business success. But how many companies treat DEI initiatives as a true organizational imperative?

    The unfortunate answer: not enough. “Prominent tech companies have made little progress in their stated goal of hiring more minorities,” notes one CNBC article. 

    For example, many enterprises saw only “low single-digit increases in their percentage of Black employees” from 2014 to 2020. And while the gender and race wage gap is narrowing, access to opportunity and discrepancies in salaries persist for underrepresented tech talent. 

    DEI data

    For example, in our recent State of Wage Inequality in the Tech Industry report, our platform data showed: 

    36.7% of roles only sent interview requests to menThe percentage of positions only sending interview requests to white or asian men continue to drop, but is still a hefty 49%Black women continue to see the widest gap among the demographics analyzed.

    “There is still work to be done in ensuring equitable hiring processes to narrow wage and expectation gaps, and companies must prioritize this effort,” says Hired CEO Josh Brenner. 

    “Post-Great Resignation, companies successful in identifying non-traditional talent, while also ensuring diversity and representation in their candidate pipelines, will be better positioned to drive their businesses forward in a time of increased volatility.” 

    To see what steps business leaders across the country are taking to drive impactful DEI efforts, we’ve compiled actionable insights from Hired’s Talk Talent to Me podcast. Read on to learn how Match Group, Capital One, and Tech Can [Do] Better work to enact positive change—and how your organization can do the same.

    How Match Group attracts underrepresented candidates

    Expert: Match Group Vice President of Talent Acquisition, Craig Campbell

    Examine your entire hiring process

    To build a pipeline of diverse talent, Campbell suggests baking DEI into every part of your hiring process: from branding to sourcing to interviewing. “Think about what you’re doing to attract the right talent,” he says. “Can you stand on your approach and say it’s end-to-end fair, objective, and inclusive?” 

    Revisit value propositions

    In a crowded marketplace, corporate branding can make or break your recruiting efforts. 

    As Campbell puts it, “Do you present an attractive value proposition to start with, and then are you ensuring that you’re not doing things to diminish your opportunity to convert as much talent as possible? 

    That’s something you can apply in general, and then even more specifically when you start to think about segments like Black or African-American, Latinx, women, and the LGBTQ community. 

    For each underrepresented segment in your organization, you have to take an inside-out approach to determine: Do I have the right value proposition to attract that audience?” 

    Many businesses already use market segmentation for customer acquisition—and the same strategies can be used to attract diverse candidates. “I don’t think it’s a far reach to apply some of that expertise to talent segmentation,” says Campbell.  

    Take a stance on social issues

    Candidates will notice what your company does—and doesn’t—say. 

    As Campbell puts it, “Another part of your value proposition is your position as it relates to social causes. I think that’s a new and emerging component of the value proposition, with candidates asking companies what they stand for and how that shows up in how they do business and support employees.” 

    According to Edelman’s 2022 Trust Barometer, 60% of respondents said they will choose a place to work based on their beliefs and values. 

    Organizations with clear answers and concrete evidence will stand out for their commitment to taking action. “Whether you have a story to tell—or more importantly, a track record—could be the difference between you being more or less competitive,” says Campbell.

    Listen to the whole episode

    How Capital One nurtures an inclusive culture

    Expert: Capital One Senior Director of Diversity Talent Acquisition, Kanika Raney

    Prioritize DEI initiatives in onboarding

    At Capital One, Raney is proud to have helped shape a successful onboarding program that sets the tone for company culture and employee experience. 

    “Everyone goes through a day-long training to learn more about our culture and values,” she says. “For us, it’s essential they feel included from day one.” 

    Part of that mission means emphasizing DEI initiatives through the onboarding process—and encouraging new employees to get involved with relevant business resource groups and activities. 

    Onboarding isn’t something that occurs only when someone starts a new job, though. Rather, it happens any time there is a transition—and DEI should be emphasized at each milestone. 

    “That can be when you transfer to a new role, when you get a new manager, if there’s a reorganization, or if you’re returning from an extended leave,” explains Raney. “And companies should have an onboarding strategy for each of these defining moments in an employee’s career.”

    Unburden minority employees

    Far too often, the burden falls on minority groups to cultivate inclusivity within an organization. “More often than not, if you’re the only female or the only Latinx employee at a senior level, you’re going to be tapped on the shoulder every single time,” says Raney. “And that becomes a lot for one person representing one demographic.” 

    Tokenism [to-ken-ism] /ˈtōkəˌnizəm/ noun

    “The practice of doing something, such as hiring a person from a minority group, just to appear to be treating people fairly and to avoid criticism.” 

    To prevent tokenism,  business leaders should own this responsibility themselves rather than relying exclusively on employee groups. 

    For example, Capital One hosted a speaker series to advance authentic dialogue, grow DEI awareness, and promote allyship. 

    “It’s about creating the space for open dialogue and allowing people to join in on a voluntary basis versus putting employees on the spot and making them feel like, ‘I’m the one that has to step up and answer this question,’” explains Raney. 

    Related: Panel discussion: “Close the Gap with Advocacy & Allyship”

    Forget about “culture fits” 

    Rather than hiring candidates who are culture fits, Raney suggests rewriting the script and seeking culture adds. 

    “Why are we trying to force people into a fit?” she asks. “It should be less about, ‘Can you fit into this culture?’ and more about, ‘What are you adding to this culture?’” 

    To that end, Raney emphasizes the importance of training staff to think differently during the recruitment process. 

    For instance, hiring teams might ask: 

    Can this candidate bring an alternative perspective to the organization? In what ways will their original insights benefit our business? If someone is missing a credential, can they learn relevant skills on the job? Are they growth-minded? Do they offer something we didn’t even know we needed? 

    Listen to the whole episode

    How Tech Can [Do] Better leverages critical diversity data

    Expert: Tech Can [Do] Better founder & CEO, Lawrence Humphrey

    Partner with outside organizations 

    Humphrey’s nonprofit, Tech Can [Do] Better, was founded one week after the murder of George Floyd. “We’re all about driving racial equity, and equity more broadly, in and through the tech industry,” says Humphrey. 

    “This was a window of opportunity like none I’d ever seen before, so I thought: How can we turn this moment into a movement where all of the most influential companies in the world have an ear for systemic change? How can we actually make something out of it?” 

    Today, Tech Can [Do] Better partners with innovative organizations to provide data-driven perspectives on how to enact change. “You can’t improve what you don’t measure,” explains Humphrey, quoting a famous maxim. 

    In running reports for tech companies, he helps business leaders identify—and fill—critical representation gaps. A large part of that process is breaking down data by gender, role, tenure, and other variables. 

    “You need to be able to segment the data,” says Humphrey. “It’s not enough to say that 15% of your workforce is Black. Where are the Black folks in your workforce?” 

    By getting granular, you can identify opportunity areas that might have otherwise gone overlooked—whether that’s diversifying the C-suite or rolling out initiatives to improve retention in a certain department.

    Set realistic expectations for DEI initiatives

    “Systemic problems require systemic solutions,” says Humphrey, “and systemic solutions require a long time frame.” It’s important for talent companies to recognize meaningful change can’t occur overnight. 

    Instead, DEI initiatives are an ongoing commitment to building a better workforce. As Humphrey explains, “It’s a little bit of work done for a long time. You can’t expect to just burst through some sprints or an intense one-quarter cycle, and then achieve equity. 

    That’s not how this works. It’s a commitment—and I feel comfortable saying it’s a life-long commitment.”

    Listen to the whole episode

    Here’s What You Can Do to Make DEI a Priority 

    Embrace best practices

    List salary bands. Use technology to reduce bias. Drop requirements for traditional four-year degrees and avail roles to those with non-traditional educational backgrounds, like bootcamps. In our 2022 State of Software Engineers report research, we found in 2021: 

    46% of software engineers had a computer science degree24% were self taught18% have a relevant college degree (ex., mathematics, information technology, data science, etc.)11% participated in a bootcamp program.

    In each case, the percentage increased 1% from 2020, except for “relevant college degree,” which decreased 4%.

    We’ve also seen wonderful results of bootcamp graduates on Hired, such as Paula Muldoon, who transitioned careers. After earning multiple degrees in and enjoying a music career, she joined a program through our partner, Makers, in the UK. She’s now a software engineer for Zopa, a leading financial company. 

    We’ve already seen great examples of DEI on our platform. So much so that we scored employers on our core values of equity, efficiency, and transparency in our first List of Top Employers Winning Tech Talent. Want to make the next list? Draw on these top ranking companies inside for inspiration.

    If you’re ready to follow in these organizations’ footsteps, Hired is here to help. By leveraging our platform’s innovative DEI tools and transparent salary data, we help your company build diverse teams and close critical wage gaps—one hire at a time.  More

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    2022 State of Software Engineers: UK and Cross-Border Trends

    KEY TAKEAWAYS

    Top issues and trends for software engineers Most in-demand skills and rolesSalary data for software engineers in the UK and nearby European countries

    About this Report

    At Hired, our mission is to surface the best tech talent anywhere to help you fill your open roles and progress on DEI goals. But how?Our platform expanded beyond traditional tech markets this spring to include actively-engaged, curated talent around the world.We partnered with HR global marketplace leaders like Remote and Oyster, to help employers take the next step after surfacing talent on our platform. These partners help guide employers with specifics on workplace and hiring protocol, as well as HR compliance in payroll and other tasks.Based on our annual State of Software Engineers report, this content focuses on software engineers in the UK, as well as France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Spain, and Sweden. With data shared from our partner, Oyster, we bring new insights to recruiters and employers seeking to expand talent teams in these areas.Containing loads of resources for attracting and hiring remote tech talent, this content also helps you navigate global recruitment and personalise your strategy for various regions.Are you a software engineer in the United Kingdom interested in a new role? If so, we have a lot of information for you too! We share the top countries eager to hire UK tech talent. We also dive into where remote demand is accelerating the fastest and average salaries. More

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    What’s the Deal with Web 3.0 & How Does it Affect Tech Talent?

    If you’re in tech, you can’t avoid frequent mentions of Web 3.0. From 2021’s $69m NFT sale to the Dogecoin hype cycle created by Elon Musk and the famed Los Angeles Staples Center becoming the Crypto.com arena, crypto went mass market and with it, Web 3.0. Web 3.0 is the infrastructure, or more specifically the […] More