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    Anxiety, Fear of Failure? You’re Not Alone: How to Overcome Imposter Syndrome

    Have you ever felt like you’re in way over your head in your career? Or maybe read a job description and thought, ‘there’s no way I’m qualified for that’? If so, you may be experiencing imposter syndrome. 

    Imposter syndrome is the appearance of anxious thoughts and feelings leading you to believe you’re out of your depth in a certain situation or like you’re a fake who may be discovered at any point. You might feel like you’re not deserving of success, praise, or even a new job or promotion. 

    While imposter syndrome doesn’t gender discriminate, this scientific study explains how imposter syndrome manifests within professional women: “Despite objective evidence of success, these women had a pervasive psychological experience believing that they were intellectual frauds and feared being recognized as impostors. They suffered from anxiety, fear of failure, and dissatisfaction with life.” 

    Imposter syndrome has become a bit of a buzzword in many tech and business circles — but it’s not without reason. It is a common underlying fear in many professionals with up to 82% of people experiencing it. Imposter syndrome is especially prevalent in those looking for new jobs. Read on to understand the root causes of imposter syndrome, how to detect it, and actionable tips on how to combat it during the job search process.

    Identify ways to spot imposter syndrome

    These feelings of inadequacy can be insidious and not altogether apparent. You may not even realize you’re experiencing imposter syndrome. 

    As Jessica Bennett, author of Feminist Fight Club, explains in her FastCompany article, imposter syndrome comes in many flavors. Bennett outlines the most common ways you to identify you’re experiencing it: 

    Feeling sure you’re going to fail or embarrass yourself.  

    Feeling like you’ll be exposed at any moment and tricked people to get your position.

    Devaluing your worth or minimizing your accomplishments, even if others are actively championing you. 

    Underestimating your expertise, like thinking you’re not qualified for a new job (more on this in the next sections).  

    Understanding the impact on underrepresented groups

    Unfortunately, imposter syndrome is more common amongst women and underrepresented groups. Studies show female entrepreneurs experience imposter fear to the degree that it hinders career growth. Even prior to entering the professional world, college students found links between imposter feelings and certain ethnic groups, leading to mental health problems. 

    We recommend Sheryl Nance-Nash’s BBC article for a deep dive on how oppression, systematic racism, and unequal representation leads to more instances of imposter syndrome for women of color.

    In a personal reflection from a member of our partner Diversability, Puneet S. says, “I only apply or do something if I am 110% sure and prepared. At times, I still doubt if I am good enough for the project. Some say historically marginalized groups tend to self-select opportunities so we should apply even if we don’t meet every criterion. This has helped me become aware of my unconscious bias and pushed me to show up and self-advocate.”

    In a conversation on imposter syndrome, it’s important to recognize and understand the impact of structural issues embedded in it. Addressing imposter syndrome is really tied to fixing these broader societal institutions. An article from Harvard Business Review urges the narrative to switch from fixing people to fixing bias, as feeling like an outsider is often the result of systemic issues. In this context, the onus is on leaders to help stir change. 

    Shifting from a big picture view, let’s review how amid these larger structural problems, you can practice self-care and resilience to face imposter syndrome. 

    5 ways to defeat imposter syndrome in the job hunt

    Imposter syndrome may manifest itself within your job search. If you’re on the hunt for a career change, but find yourself doubting your experience, abilities, or strengths, it may keep you from applying to certain roles. You might look at a job description and think there’s no way you could measure up, even if you have both the preferred proficiencies and experiences listed in the description – that’s imposter syndrome rearing its ugly head. 

    Qualify yourself 

    Brittany King, Senior Manager, TA-Talent Intelligence & Diversity, and a member of our partner Sista Circle says, “As someone who has been in the Talent Acquisition space for some time, I often hear about the effects imposter syndrome can have on jobseekers, namely early career talent or talent looking to break into a new industry. 

    Ultimately, the circular dynamic of “experienced required” vs “I need a job to get experience” leaves many feeling hopeless and lost. After all, how should one actually get experience without experience? 

    For me, it’s a simple answer: ‘Qualify yourself.’ I don’t mean wake up tomorrow and pursue the role of CEO fresh out of college, but I do mean checking-all-the-boxes is not required for success in a role. Good companies know that. This is especially important if you’re a member of a historically marginalized community. 

    For example, research has shown women only apply if they meet nearly 90% of the requirements of a role whereas men tend to apply when they meet only 50-60% of the requirements. This is a good case for the reality that it’s not always the “qualified” who get the job, but those who had the temerity to qualify themselves.”

    Below you’ll find our tips for countering feelings of inadequacy and gaining the courage to confidently apply to more positions.

    1. Keep a “Wins Folder”

    When you’re feeling unqualified, it’s easy to forget the amazing things you’ve done. Cataloging your accomplishments and milestones is a great way to reinforce your worth. Start a “Wins” folder, either on your desktop or in Google Drive. The idea is to organize and track your professional achievements. 

    If you’re ever feeling unsure and incompetent, open the folder and scan some entries. Pull it up before you go into any intimidating situation—an important meeting, performance review, or even a casual catchup with someone impressive in the office. As a bonus, you likely need some of this information for job applications, so it will be easy to access.

    Ideas of the collateral to save:

    Collect any positive feedback from colleagues, supervisors, clients, or customers, i.e., performance reviews or project assessments. You could even screenshot encouraging emails as a PDF. 

    Keep track of benchmarks and goals you hit in your previous roles (sales quotas, effective campaigns, etc.). 

    Notate any promotions you’ve received and any positive evaluation accompanying it.

    LaShawnda Rodgers is VP of Community Outreach for Blacks In Technology RDU among other roles including Founder, Leadership Coach, and Corporate Trainer. Based on her experiences with clients, she shares advice for jobseekers.

    “Keeping a detailed list of your accomplishments is imperative in job hunting to defeat imposter syndrome. It allows you to see and acknowledge how brilliant you are… I have my coaching clients ask themselves where those negative thoughts come from and if they are facts. Facts can be proven. If the answer is no, then they aren’t true. 

    Remember, the unfamiliar is scary but necessary for growth. Change your language about things that are unfamiliar. Instead of saying, ‘I have no knowledge of XYZ,’ say ‘I am in the processing of learning about XYZ.’” 

    2. Develop constant feedback loops

    People who experience imposter syndrome are often hesitant to ask for feedback. It makes you more vulnerable. Yet, getting frequent feedback is actually a powerful way to combat insecurities at work. 

    For starters, good feedback loops surface constructive criticism and an opportunity for positive reinforcement. Setting up the right feedback mechanisms with your manager and colleagues helps you see what you’re doing well in the eyes of others. It also offers up more evidence to add to your achievements (get it in that Wins Folder!). If you notice particular instances when you feel imposter syndrome creep in more, try to establish feedback around those events. 

    Further, frequent feedback gives you more real-time input into how your performance and behavior comes off to others. If you get nervous in meetings, for example, ask for feedback on a specific meeting or presentation soon after it happens. Those who suffer from imposter syndrome might dwell on a minor detail (like stumbling over a sentence) for months. Hearing from someone else on what went well and what didn’t will help reframe your thoughts.

    3. Set and track achievable goals

    Setting small, realistic goals, allows you to identify tangible accomplishments and celebrate meeting them, effectively bolstering your self-esteem. 

    As the productivity experts at Hubgets explain, “without specific, decisive goals to point you in a clear direction, it can be a challenge to find motivation and purpose… Establish your main target each day and set out to achieve it before working hours are over. The thrill of pursuit and the pride of success are excellent motivators.”

    When job hunting, your goals might be small tasks like: update my resume or apply to three positions this weekend. Then, make sure to recognize and celebrate when you meet those objectives. This consistent reinforcement will help boost your self-confidence and keep you motivated during the job search, especially when feelings of doubt or low self-worth pop up. 

    As we all know, looking for a new job can be a discouraging process. This practice will help!

    4. Network with peers

    Comparison may be a dangerous habit during the job search. Keep this in mind: the goal of networking isn’t to measure yourself against others in your industry. It’s more so to give you perspective. 

    When you join new groups or attend events, you’ll receive a broader sense of the current job landscape. Additionally, you’ll create invaluable relationships with folks who may be outside your current organization but still understand what you’re going through. As such, you’ll receive support, positive reinforcement, and validation.

    Also, look for those who’ve successfully completed a job hunt and ask about their experiences. You might be surprised how many others felt imposter syndrome during the process only to end up in a role they rightfully deserved. 

    Related: Hired Partners: Community and Networking for Jobseekers

    5. Fill up your tool box 

    There are many tools to incorporate into your daily life to reaffirm your worth. You just need to understand them, experiment with them, and see what works for you. 

    To get started, try these practices:

    Meditate while asking yourself questions to gain clarity. For example, “What am I trying to achieve? What am I doing that works?”  

    Focusing on abundance by listing what you’re grateful for in your life and career.  

    Take self-assessment tests to better understand your personality, strengths, and weaknesses, i.e., Meyers-Briggs, Enneagram, PATH Assessment.  

    Journal to dig deeper into issues or release negative thoughts. 

    Avoid imposter syndrome and find the perfect role

    Imposter syndrome can rob you of your confidence and make you doubt your unique skills and experiences. Even worse, it might make you second guess applying for a new position that’s perfect for you. 

    Instead of beating yourself up or getting lost in negative thoughts, take action against imposter syndrome. Use the above strategies to reinvigorate your mindset and banish thoughts of skepticism and worry. Know you’re not alone when you feel doubt, and remind yourself of your qualifications. 

    Happy job hunting! 

    Continue reading our Ally Series: More

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    Day in the Life: Working at One of the Biggest Accounting Firms in the US

    There is nothing that compares to an energetic, engaged, and sociable office environment. A place that feels like a second home, where you know everybody, where you can put your best foot forward, and where you can grow and thrive with a group of diverse minds who aren’t just your colleagues but your friends too.

    We’re happy to say that such an office exists in the heart of Minneapolis. KPMG Minneapolis has built a culture and community that goes far beyond an office space. In our conversations with employees from the KPMG Minneapolis office, both new and old, we discovered what makes their office perfect for those who want more than a run-of-the-mill office experience.

    Collective Problem-Solving

    A very common worry that a lot of entry-level employees or early career professionals come across is what to do when faced with obstacles. As is the case with any new job, challenges will arise, so this is very natural.

    When we spoke with Reece English, a former intern and current Tax Associate at KPMG, he mentioned that having a bunch of fellow colleagues in the same position as him was incredibly helpful. For example, one day Reece was having an issue with a platform he was using at his desk. After firing off a question to a fellow colleague, instead of replying in the chat, she stopped what she was doing and went over to Reece’s desk and walked him through it.

    Whether it’s asking a fellow intern for a ride to work or getting a managing partner to look over a review you did, everyone at KPMG seeks to support one another whenever possible.

    Social Life

    In our conversations with employees from KPMG, we discovered that they cultivate a culture that values socializing and employee interaction. Pizza days, taco Tuesdays, morning coffee and donuts, and happy hours are incredibly common at the KPMG Minneapolis office. These events help build camaraderie and meaningful bonds between employees.

    The Minneapolis office even has a basketball team and kickball team. While the basketball team is company-wide, the kickball team is exclusively for interns and gives them the chance to compete in a tournament against the other Big Four accounting firms. KPMG won in 2021 but lost in 2022 so they are hoping for a big comeback next year.

    Lastly, the training at the KPMG Lakehouse in Orlando also underscores the firm’s dedication to building a well-connected community. Every year, all KPMG professionals from, intern to partner, head down to the training and innovation center to upskill, socialize, and get to know one another better. Fit with a gym, social venues, and tons of other amenities, the experiences at Lakehouse goes to show KPMG’s dedication to creating fun and lasting bonds between employees.

    Real Experience with Clients

    The KPMG Minneapolis office is particularly unique because of its close proximity to its clients, many of which are Fortune 500 companies. In fact, Minnesota is home to over fifteen Fortune 500 companies, most of which are audit, tax and/or advisory clients of the Minneapolis office. What this means is interns and associates get the chance to interact and work directly with clients on a regular basis.

    Whether it’s through coffee chats, boardroom meetings, or onsite engagements, employees get the chance to work directly with these clients as they help influence business decisions in real-time! For Lilli Denison, that meant no day was the same.

    This communal aspect, paired with the client engagement that even interns get to partake in, made Lilli realize that employees at the Minneapolis office would always be exposed to new, exciting, and meaningful work.

    A Supportive Network

    Another one of the most alluring aspects of the KPMG Minneapolis office is the bottomless support network provided by fellow colleagues and partners. In our conversation with James Powell, the office managing partner in Minneapolis, he spoke about the “pass it forward” mentality that exists throughout the organization.

    James emphasized how there is a “whole network of people who, yes, have a job to do, but at the same time also find it very important to make sure that the people around them are successful.” James went on to say how much of a proud culture the KPMG Minneapolis office has and how that pride reverberates off the behavior of employees helping one another. This pride stems from their devotion to helping fellow colleagues and lifting each other up whenever possible.

    At KPMG, it doesn’t matter if you’ve been with the company for a day or a decade, everyone is treated the same and given the same opportunities to grow and succeed.

    Make the Minneapolis Leap

    People choose to stay at KPMG for a variety of reasons. Some include the ones we mentioned earlier, but many of them are discovered by the employees themselves. Whether it’s the support system, the social life, or the paths to success that are paved for each and every employee, the KPMG Minneapolis office is the destination where early career professionals go to thrive.

    Learn more about the internships and open roles that KPMG is looking to fill at their Minneapolis office and locations across the country here and begin your road to success! More

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    Five Job Application Tips from Full-Time Business Analysts

    When you’re applying for a job, there are several questions that are likely to run through your head. Does my resume need to be updated? Am I portraying myself well? Have I prepared enough?

    Unfortunately, a lot of these job application questions don’t get answered until the process is over. However, we’ve been put in a unique position to give you the answers you’re looking for no matter what stage of the application process you’re in. We recently had the opportunity to get those behind-the-scenes answers firsthand.

    Recently, we sat down with two junior business analysts at Maximus, a consulting company tasked with protecting health, supporting families, and streamlining government services, to hear how they crushed the interview and application process. In our conversations with them, they revealed what it takes to stand out to recruiters both at Maximus and in the professional world.

    Format Your Resume for the Job You Want

    Odds are you’ve been hearing different kinds of resume advice over the years – keep it to one page, think beyond your job duties, highlight relevant skills, etc. While some advice is better than others, what Zain Baig, Business Analyst and former intern at Maximus, believes is most important is to format your resume for the job you want.

    Zain didn’t have experience in the industry or department that he was applying for. However, by reframing the past experiences on his resume in a way that was aligned with the internship he was applying for, he seemed more like a fit in the eyes of the recruiter.

    Make Use of Networking Opportunities

    Recruiters and employers also want to see prospective students attend networking opportunities available to them.

    While it isn’t likely to land a job on the spot at a career fair, that’s not necessarily the point. Making this first point of contact sets you up for your second, third, and fourth moves. Now you have established familiarity with the recruiter or employer, which will make you stand out in the application process. However, that’s not the only benefit.

    Benefits of attending a career fair/networking event:

    Gain more knowledge about a company

    Establish familiarity with recruiters

    Practice interacting in a professional setting

    Find out what you do and don’t like

    Whether it shows you something you never thought you’d like or just helps you stretch those networking muscles, there really isn’t a reason not to take advantage of these events.

    Know the Basics About a Company

    This next piece of advice might seem obvious but is often overlooked by so many students and young professionals looking for a job. When you’re applying for a job, a major red flag in the eyes of recruiters is a candidate who doesn’t know anything about the company.

    What Edda did to prepare for the interview process was simple. She went to the Maximus website, clicked through various pages, read about the company’s offerings, and caught up on the most recent articles they published. This gave her just enough information to speak with interest and familiarity for the company, something always stands out to recruiters. 

    Be Prepared for Tough Questions

    One of the harder parts about applying and interviewing for jobs is answering questions on the spot. This is because there is only so much you can do to prepare for them. Chances are, you’ll be getting asked a question you didn’t expect or have a planned answer for.

    What’s most important about crossing this bridge is approaching the question genuinely. If you need a second to think about an answer, politely ask for a moment to reflect. Recruiters will appreciate that much more than you rushing to a conclusion or pretending to know something you don’t.

    Additionally, recruiters suggest not to over-prepare for questions with copy-and-paste answers. Recruiters can tell when you’ve put together responses in advance, especially when you’re reading them on your screen. Again, approach the question genuinely and craft your response with care, precision, and grace.

    Express a Desire to Learn

    While all the tips on this list will help you shine brighter in the eyes of recruiters, the most important thing young professionals should do when looking for a job is express a desire to learn. 

    For those who are early in their professional careers, chances are you don’t have a whole lot of job experience. So, what you need to let the interviewer know more than anything else is that you want to learn. But you have to be direct about it! What is it you want to learn more about? What skills do you hope to learn? What position would you like to eventually see yourself in?

    By expressing this desire to grow and learn with a company, recruiters will always be more willing to give you a chance to prove yourself.

    While both Zain and Edda followed different paths to get to where they are now, they both relied on these core tips to secure jobs that launched their careers.

    Now that you know what it takes to crush the job application process, why not try your luck? Start browsing open positions today! More

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    How Meritage Homes Is Diversifying the Home Building Space One Job at a Time

    There are a lot of factors to consider when determining where you want to work. Location, salary, position, and culture are all crucial details that will impact your experience with a company and ultimately, the trajectory of your professional career.

    In addition to these crucial factors, one characteristic that everyone seems to be looking for in a company is an inclusive environment. As we’ve come to understand, fostering a culture that acknowledges and supports people from different backgrounds leads to incredible growth for the company, the employees, and oftentimes the industry as a whole.

    But what does an inclusive company look like? And how are you supposed to know if your particular background and individuality will thrive there?

    In order to find out, we spoke with Meritage Homes Vice President of Inclusion and Culture, Regina Rivera, and Assistant Construction Manager, Madison Martin, about what diversity means at their company. In our conversations, they spoke about the company’s interpretation of diversity, why it’s important, how the company supports it, and all the benefits gained from embracing inclusion.

    Diversity of Skills, Behavior, and Experience

    One of the most fascinating pieces of information that arose from our conversation with Regina is how Meritage Homes interprets diversity. Regina emphasized that they don’t singularly look at someone’s particular race or background; they also focus on their skills and experiences.

    Being that we think and behave based on our life experiences, this made perfect sense. While someone’s race or gender may have led them to particular experiences in life, Meritage Homes focuses on the results of those experiences. Regina described how they think about diversity “not just through the race and gender lens, but the diversity of behavior” as well.

    She went on to talk about how professionals from outside the industry “can speak and share different perspectives and comment on the work from a different angle.” At Meritage Homes, this is what they believe will help drive innovation.

    Why Diversity And Inclusion Is Important

    At Meritage Homes, the end goal isn’t to meet some quota or percentage. While they do care about increasing representation in their company, Meritage Homes doesn’t base their success solely on numbers. They base it on how well the values of their company are being embraced and demonstrated by their employees’ values that are enhanced by collaboration and a supportive network.

    Regina spoke about one of Meritage Homes’ behavior anchor statements regarding “playing to win” and “collaborating as a team.” She stated, “To live out the concept of diversity, equity, and inclusion is to live our [Meritage Homes’] values.” The whole idea of collaboration is to create with people who can provide different perspectives and insight than you. What better way to do that than by creating a workforce filled with people who had different experiences and come from a variety of backgrounds?

    While diversity is important in its contributions to the growth and profitability of the company, one of the most important differences it makes is to the employee experience at Meritage—their level of comfort, belonging, and connection in the workplace.

    How They’re Supporting Diversity and Inclusion

    So it’s clear that Meritage Homes knows what diversity and inclusivity look like and why it’s important, but how do they support and empower it? Meritage is committed to weaving diversity, equity, and inclusion into the company fabric. They emphasize to their team members and leaders that DE&I isn’t something extra that they must do but is a part of strategy and operations every day.

    Raising awareness has definitely been a starting point. The willingness to have conversations, acknowledge one’s bias (both conscious and unconscious), and actively take steps to pause and consider alternative ways of doing things is essential.

    Through regular communication, training, micro-learning, modeling, linking and labeling behavior, Meritage is sharpening an inclusive leadership mindset and building DE&I skills throughout the organization. 

    Today, Meritage Homes continues to lead this inclusive revolution by not only diversifying their employee base but training them to lead in a way that reflects Meritage’s core values as well.

    The Benefits of Diversity

    While the benefits of Meritage Homes’ actions and initiatives towards diversity are felt in the workforce, marketplace, and workplace, we’d like to concentrate on the workplace as it has the most immediate influence on what the day-to-day will be like as an employee.

    Madison Martin, an Assistant Construction Manager, is a perfect example of how Meritage Homes’ inclusive ideals were beneficial. When Madison first came across the job listing, she wasn’t sure if homebuilding was right for her as she had preconceptions about the construction industry.

    However, during the interview process, Madison realized that Meritage Homes doesn’t believe in one particular background for any of its roles. 

    Madison said this discussion about the value of people with different backgrounds and areas of expertise ultimately helped her make the decision to join the Meritage team.

    Madison shared that she immediately felt welcomed and was treated like a member of the team. She has felt both challenged and supported as she has learned her new role. 

    Madison joined Meritage Homes as an intern and after a few months, she was offered a full-time position as an Assistant Construction Manager. 

    By redefining what diversity means and reshaping what an inclusive environment feels like, Meritage Homes has created a revolutionary culture that is bound to send waves across the industry.

    Their lens is a unique one and their mission is a brave one. Will you join Meritage Homes as they seek to enhance the home building industry one job at a time?

    Start browsing open positions and internships today. More

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    How to Get Approved on Hired

    Hired is a closed, curated marketplace that strives to create the best experience possible for jobseekers and hiring managers alike. In order to achieve this, our machine learning algorithm vets candidates and companies before they receive an invite to go live on Hired. 

    Candidates must have an in-demand skill set (meaning active Hired employers have open roles requiring those skills), ideally 2+ years of relevant experience, and a completed profile with a resume and/or LinkedIn URL included. Candidates must also display an intent to start interviewing right away.

    Companies must have a clear need to hire, and be willing to provide compensation and role details in the offers they make on our platform.

    In which locations can I find a job through Hired?

    Hired works with companies primarily in the US, UK, and Canada. Traditionally, we see our strongest presence both in terms of company and candidate volume in major tech hub cities. However, Hired now offers remote talent around the world. Provided candidates are open to remote work or the possibility of relocation while meeting our other criteria, they can go live to employers whoo source talent from all over the world. 

    What skill sets are companies looking for on Hired?

    Our primary focus is technical roles but we recently added some customer-facing positions, such as account executives and customer experience manager. Currently, open roles favor candidates with 2+ years of full-time experience in software engineering, product management, engineering management, data analytics/science, quality assurance, devops, design, and sales with a wide variety of specialties for each role. That said, we are constantly working with employers to scale their teams, so check this list periodically for additions.

    What type of roles does Hired support?

    Companies on Hired are looking to fill full-time/permanent and contract roles. These roles can be on-site, remote, or hybrid. Currently, we do not support internship, part-time, or C2C roles. 

    I am looking to begin my career in tech or transition into a technical role. Can Hired help me?

    Our companies are typically seeking jobseekers with 2+ years of full-time experience in a relevant role. As a result, Hired isn’t best suited for jobseekers fresh from a career transition or graduation. However, we partner with General Assembly and graduates of their software engineering and data science immersive programs can go live to our companies with less than 2 years of full-time experience. 

    I’m just interested in seeing what I’m worth. Is the Hired platform for me? 

    The Hired platform is meant for candidates who intend to start interviewing right away as the companies we support are looking to hire immediately. If you’re ready to start a new role within 30 days, we encourage you to create and submit your profile (for free!). If not, you are welcome to check out the Hired Salary Calculator to view offer salary data from others with similar skill-sets, specialties, and years of experience.

    Once approved, the platform promotes your profile to employers ‌for at least 2 weeks. When the platform detects a potentially good fit, the employer can request an interview and your job search progresses from there! More

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    In Three Words: Dow Jones Interns Break Down Their Summers

    Landing an internship at Dow Jones is an opportunity to work for a company that makes a worldwide impact. As a global company with over 5,500 employees, our mission is to provide the world’s most trusted journalism, data, and analysis to help people make decisions.

    Whether it’s helping our readers make decisions through our flagship publications, The Wall Street Journal and Barron’s Group, or helping companies make decisions with our world-class data and analytics services, we educate and inform people to make choices and form opinions everywhere.

    At Dow Jones, it doesn’t matter what area of business your internship is in, you can be certain it will be an immersive experience with meaningful and impactful work. During your internship, you will be working hands-on with real projects and business objectives. Additionally, you will learn how to grow and harness your skills through professional development sessions and networking events with executives and our CEO, Almar Latour.

    For insight into the “real” Dow Jones internship experience, read what former interns who have since transitioned into full-time employees have to say. Here’s how they described their internship experience in three words. More

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    Tech Candidate Spotlight – Manuel Cheta, Senior Software Engineer in the UK

    Can you start by sharing a bit bit about your educational background? 

    After finishing Aerospace Engineering university courses I decided to go into the web development world instead. I am a self-taught Front-End Developer. I learned about HTML, CSS, Javascript after opening my first WordPress blog and learning how to modify the website and manage my hosting space as a webmaster. 

    Being self-taught, accessing Youtube videos and development blogs helped enormously. The biggest impact on my career was my decision to press on, inspect the websites, and see how they were built. 

    What would you like to learn more about?

    I recently became interested in psychology and how to help people work together to reach a common goal. In addition, I am interested in deepening my Front-End dev knowledge and connected areas like DevOps, Backend, cloud, and even AI.

    Of course, because I work in fintech, I am also interested in learning as much as I can about personal finance and investing.

    What led you to pursue a career in tech?

    I always had an interest in computers, ever since playing Prince of Persia on an Intel 286 PC in the 7th grade. Since then, I spent time learning how to install an operating system, how to debug programs, and how to help people set up their own computer or home network. 

    How has your skillset evolved over the course of your career?

    Each year, I start with the hopes of learning a lot. I do learn quite a lot and at the end of the year I feel more stupid than I felt at the start, so the cycle repeats. From learning regular HTML/CSS to working on full-scale single-page apps in various frameworks, I am always on the lookout for a better understanding of the basics and new stuff to learn.

    If you chose to specialize in one area, what was it and why?

    I specialise in Front-End and web accessibility. I love working in Front-End because it gets me as close to the user as possible. My open nature lends itself to creating code, which can be seen, read, and felt by the end user. I am also keenly interested in promoting web accessibility because I firmly believe that when you make your website accessible, you make everyone’s lives way better.

    Is your new role different from previous ones?

    This year, my focus was on fintech and as such, I worked in fintech. I call myself a nano-investor because I am just learning how to better invest my time and money. That was why I moved away from the e-commerce industry to fintech. 

    What are you most excited about in your new role or company?

    We’re starting a new project and I can have the biggest impact right now since my experience as a senior dev can bring in the most value in setting the direction of development. Having worked on many projects I can identify pain points and offer suggestions.

    What was your job search experience like before you joined Hired?

    When I was a junior dev, a number of years ago when sites like Hired didn’t exist, I would simply push my CVs to different platforms without any hope of actually getting a response. Now, Hired makes my life way easier because I can tailor my profile to the industry I am interested in and I receive interview requests only from the companies I would be genuinely interested in. 

    What’s your best advice for jobseekers on Hired? 

    Make sure to have a 1-2 page CV that’s not too long. Also, create a specific “keywords” section to help the automated system identify your domain of work. When setting your profile to “open for work,” make sure your short bio concisely explains what your interests are.

    Be sure to use the correct asking price for the role and industry you are in. In terms of the asking price, insert a specific number like 65,789 so you attract more inquisitive recruiter minds. 

    Related: Want More Interviews and Better Matches? 5 Key Tips!

    What would you tell someone who’s curious about Hired?

    Just sign up! Spend a bit of time writing the best descriptions you can in each section and make sure you indicate the specific industry you want to work in. 

    Any general advice you’d like to give other tech professionals?

    Spend time learning about the companies your are interviewing for and what their interview process is like. Being a good tech professional matters. However, companies are looking for people who are enthusiastic about their company and like to work with others. Therefore, soft skills are more highly rated than tech skills. Tech can be learned, but culture and caring for your colleagues is not an easily teachable and transferrable skill.

    Congrats on the job, Manuel! Interested in landing a great role in the UK like Manuel did? Complete your free profile on Hired today!

    About Compare The Market

    Compare The Market is a price comparison website and provides customers with an easy way to make the right choice on a wide range of products including motor, home, life and energy. Founded in 2005, Compare the Market has between 501-1,000 employees and is headquartered in London. In 2021, it made Hired’s List of Top Employers Winning Tech Talent.

    Tech Stack

    JavaScript, Node.js, MongoDB, AWS, C#, .NET, iOS, Android, Docker, Git, HTML, CSS, Scala, Java, Kafka, Kubernetes, Python, React, Redux, Big Data

    Benefits

    Life/disability insurance, work-from-home flexibility, volunteer time off, flexible working hours, employee discount programs, and more. More

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    How An Assistant Vice President Launched His Career with WayUp

    There is no one set path to your dream job. As you move through life, college, and your early professional career, new avenues will appear and opportunities will begin to show themselves.

    While there are several places to look for these new avenues and opportunities, one place that a lot of early career candidates are using to find jobs is WayUp. One individual who used WayUp to find his dream job is Louis Smith, an assistant vice president at multinational universal bank, Barclays.

    Recently, we got the chance to chat with Louis to hear all about how he went from intern, to analyst, to assistant vice president in just three years. In our conversation, Louis mentioned some career tips and insights into the job-hunting process, what his internship was like, and why he loves working at Barclays so much.

    The Job Search

    In late 2018, Louis knew he wanted to explore finance, work in New York, and thought that it would be cool to work at a bank. He knew what he wanted, but he didn’t necessarily know where to find it. What he ended up doing, and now recommends to current job seekers, is find out everything he wanted out of a job – industry, location, position, etc. – and narrow down the search as much as possible.

    Luckily, WayUp provided him with the perfect place to do that.

    As a lot of college students, early career professionals, and job seekers will find, it can be hard to figure out what kind of job you want. What made things easier for Louis was scanning the market with WayUp, finding out what he did and didn’t like from job applications and filters, and shooting his shot from there. Eventually, he came across Barclays and their summer analyst internship.

    An Internship of a Lifetime

    While Louis had past job experience, his summer banking internship at Barclays in 2019 was his first major job in an office setting. Besides the fact that he was working in Manhattan, just a few blocks away from Time Square, and doing what he had always wanted to do, Louis didn’t really know what to expect during his summer at Barclays.

    As it turned out, Barclays’ summer analyst internship was the perfect combination of exploration and support. Louis was able to explore new territory, learn new concepts, and make significant contributions to the business all at the same time. 

    Whether it was financial analysis and modeling or valuation and client due diligence, Louis’ time during Barclays’ summer internship program exposed him to the world of corporate banking and all the opportunities that existed within it. Something that made his time at Barclays even better, however, is the culture, environment, and people at Barclays.

    What Makes Barclays Different

    The finance and banking industry is massive. That means that there is no shortage of places to work and grow your career. However, each of these institutions has something that sets them apart. For Barclays, it’s the culture and people that make their company stand out so much.

    For Louis, going to work meant he would be surrounded by people who don’t just care about performing their jobs, but uplifting and helping one another grow as well. In turn, this helped him appreciate his own role at the company and stay motivated to contribute to the company’s goals as well as his own.

    A Community Perspective

    While this people-forward mindset is certainly prioritized at Barclays, it goes a step further with employee resource groups. These employee-led organizations, whose aim is to foster a diverse, inclusive workplace aligned with the organizations they serve, have proved to have enormous benefits for employees.

    As is the case with the employee resource groups at Barclays, Louis has certainly gained a lot with his involvement in the Black Professionals ERG. Specifically, as it pertains to his interactions with people he didn’t normally get to interact with.

    Additionally, Louis’ involvement in the Black Professionals Group has also allowed him to take on new roles and responsibilities. From leading panels and hosting discussions, Louis has been able to grow his skills in massive ways all while demonstrating his capabilities and competence in front of senior stakeholders. Once an intern but now an assistant vice president, Louis attributes part of his success to experiences like this.

    What Will Your Path Be?

    Although Louis Smith’s path to success was ideal, there are several different routes young professionals can take to achieve their goals. What every ambitious individual should take from his story is to make the most of the opportunities available to you.

    If you’re looking for new opportunities that could very well be the jumping-off point for a lucrative career, create your WayUp profile today and check out some of Barclays’ open roles. More