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    Keeping company culture alive in remote work and hiring

    With the transition to remote work, one intangible yet critical element of an organization that may unintentionally get lost in the shuffle and need to be reconfigured is company culture, especially if the team worked together in-person previously. From an HR perspective, fostering the core of what makes a company’s culture is that it enables teams to adapt and feel supported during a major shift in the way they work. From a talent acquisition perspective, our 2020 State of Remote Work Report found that candidates’ main concern while interviewing remotely is not gaining a true understanding of a company’s culture. For both remote work and hiring, allowing  people to have an authentic and genuine experience of a  company’s culture is critical to both employee and candidate engagement.
    During an episode of our Talent Talent to Me podcast, Jolie Loeble, VP of People Ops at Daily Harvest, joined us to discuss how the company has been able to successfully foster an in-person company culture and recreate an in-person candidate experience while being completely remote. 
    Lost in translation
    There are various considerations companies take into account when transitioning from working in-person to remote, especially so nothing is overlooked in the process. For companies who have already adapted to having a more distributed team with remote employees in addition to maintaining their in-person HQ, translating the work dynamics for the whole company may not feel as daunting. With that being said, it will still require People managers to be intentional about how teams collaborate,  are supported and, most importantly, feel connected while being distributed.
    Loeble comments on how when you walk into an office space — whether you are a customer, candidate, or employee — you can and should be able to feel a company’s culture. An office space is a living, breathing organism that is about more than just a space for collaboration–it is a space that embodies the company’s brand and that usually holds the people who drive the vibrant culture. To work and hire remotely, Loeble mentions how Daily Harvest is committed to recreating that feel of the culture.
    Standard practice
    Being intentional with how to create a work culture and foster it as a company scales matters–this is crucial to employer branding, attracting candidates to work for the company, and employer retention and productivity. Loeble says that Daily Harvest aims to create a candidate experience that matches the employee experience, both of which should mirror the customer experience. This is and should not be unique to these COVID-19 times, she states, but rather standard practice especially given these times for all People teams to be mindful of.
    Scaling culture
    Being culture conscious throughout growth periods can also help companies stay true to their roots as they scale. Loeble shares that keeping traditions from the early stages of Daily Harvest alive makes sure that the team remembers its humble beginnings. In a way, doing so pays tribute to the grit and hard work that it took to get to where they are today. Continuing traditions that are unique to a company from its inception is how culture is carried through and stands the test of time and organizational change.
    Building community
    It is important for people who interact with the company to get a feel for the rich and vibrant culture, especially for this remote world. With respect to remote hiring, Daily Harvest offers candidates they’re interviewing the opportunity to interact with its products in their homes so they can engage with the brand directly. What candidates may not be able to physically interact with right now, virtual tours of the workspace and photos or videos of experiences the team has with each other can showcase a hospitable, welcoming team waiting with open arms to celebrate with prospective employees. 
    Finally, staying connected to their mission, brand, and each other, beyond just work-related reasons is how Daily Harvest has successfully grown their business during a time of economic uncertainty. With two launches during lockdown, their team is not only productive but they are enjoying how they get to work and who they work with. They operate as a team that exudes a work culture that you want to be a part of, and in turn its translated to business success. More

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    Keeping Company Culture Alive in Remote Work & Hiring

    With the transition to remote work, one intangible yet critical element of an organization that may unintentionally get lost in the shuffle and needs to be reconfigured is company culture, especially if the team worked together in-person previously. From an HR perspective, fostering the core of what makes a company’s culture is that it enables teams to adapt and feel supported during a major shift in the way they work. From a talent acquisition perspective, our 2020 State of Remote Work Report found that candidates’ main concern while interviewing remotely is not gaining a true understanding of a company’s culture. For both remote work and hiring, allowing  people to have an authentic and genuine experience of a  company’s culture is critical to both employee and candidate engagement.
    During an episode of our Talent Talent to Me podcast, Jolie Loeble, VP of People Ops at Daily Harvest, joined us to discuss how the company has been able to successfully foster an in-person company culture and recreate an in-person candidate experience while being completely remote. 
    Lost in translation
    There are various considerations companies take into account when transitioning from working in-person to remote, especially so nothing is overlooked in the process. For companies who have already adapted to having a more distributed team with remote employees in addition to maintaining their in-person HQ, translating the work dynamics for the whole company may not feel as daunting. With that being said, it will still require People managers to be intentional about how teams collaborate,  are supported and, most importantly, feel connected while being distributed.
    Loeble comments on how when you walk into an office space — whether you are a customer, candidate, or employee — you can and should be able to feel a company’s culture. An office space is a living, breathing organism that is about more than just a space for collaboration–it is a space that embodies the company’s brand and that usually holds the people who drive the vibrant culture. To work and hire remotely, Loeble mentions how Daily Harvest is committed to recreating that feel of the culture.
    Standard practice
    Being intentional with how to create a work culture and foster it as a company scales matters–this is crucial to employer branding, attracting candidates to work for the company, and employer retention and productivity. Loeble says that Daily Harvest aims to create a candidate experience that matches the employee experience, both of which should mirror the customer experience. This is and should not be unique to these COVID-19 times, she states, but rather standard practice especially given these times for all People teams to be mindful of.
    Scaling culture
    Being culture conscious throughout growth periods can also help companies stay true to their roots as they scale. Loeble shares that keeping traditions from the early stages of Daily Harvest alive makes sure that the team remembers its humble beginnings. In a way, doing so pays tribute to the grit and hard work that it took to get to where they are today. Continuing traditions that are unique to a company from its inception is how culture is carried through and stands the test of time and organizational change.
    Building community
    It is important for people who interact with the company to get a feel for the rich and vibrant culture, especially for this remote world. With respect to remote hiring, Daily Harvest offers candidates they’re interviewing the opportunity to interact with its products in their homes so they can engage with the brand directly. What candidates may not be able to physically interact with right now, virtual tours of the workspace and photos or videos of experiences the team has with each other can showcase a hospitable, welcoming team waiting with open arms to celebrate with prospective employees. 
    Finally, staying connected to their mission, brand, and each other, beyond just work-related reasons is how Daily Harvest has successfully grown their business during a time of economic uncertainty. With two launches during lockdown, their team is not only productive but they are enjoying how they get to work and who they work with. They operate as a team that exudes a work culture that you want to be a part of, and in turn it’s translated to business success.

    Listen to the full episode here: More

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    Cautious expectation: Future of tech compensation in a COVID world

    In March, uncertainty due to COVID swept the world and disrupted business in a way we haven’t seen before. Since then, companies have managed to continue essential operations and now consider their return to work plan. We’ve come to a crossroads in our post-COVID world where businesses have determined if they are reopening their offices or making the conversion to go and stay distributed. One thing is certain, remote work is here to stay. As companies create a long-term return to work plan, how will work-from-anywhere affect salaries and companies’ compensation philosophy?
    It seems that as companies deliberate and plan what business operations will look like in the midst of this global pandemic, tech candidates also seem to be in limbo. Upon surveying software engineers, product managers, DevOps engineers, designers, and data scientists for our 2020 State of Salaries, respondents let us know how COVID and going remote has impacted their work and compensation expectations moving forward.
    Compensation expectations in line with pre-COVID offerings
    In Part 1 of our 2020 State of Salaries report, we discuss how since  has been year-over-year growth in all major tech hubs so understandably, candidate compensation expectations are aligned and look upward. Candidates expect their salaries to maintain, if not increase, in the near future regardless of the conditions that we now work in. Further, in Part 2, tech employees share with us that despite the effects COVID has had on businesses, a majority (90%) believe that the same work deserves the same pay regardless of where employees may be physically located. It is widely agreed upon that while remote work may be the future of how we work, it seems that tech workers aren’t as open to the potential implications it would have on how they are paid to work. Only 32% of tech candidates surveyed would be willing to accept a lower salary to work remotely and less than 25% would be open to negotiate for other compensation options.
    Relocation more appealing, but not immediate
    The idea of relocation has sparked the interest of tech employees in light of remote work. Although there are various considerations that come into play. More than half of tech employees are neutral or against localized salaries based on where the employee resides and works from–only 40% of tech employees support it. Although, while most tech employees would stay in their current city for at least 3 more years (64%), the opportunity to work remotely has made the idea of moving to an area with lower cost of living more appealing. Following experiencing a new city (31%), cost of living (24%) or the idea of more job opportunities (21%) were top motivators for candidates’ desire to relocate. It would also seem that those who were open to relocation would be interested in other tech hubs outside of their own. Without the ties to a primary office and desk location in order to accomplish necessary work tasks and projects, tech workers are warming up to the idea of work-from-anywhere vs. just working from home, depending on what work requirements may look like as companies think through and update their remote work policies.
    Uncertainty around job security
    In the past few months, collectively we have had to accept that the only thing constant and promised is change. As smaller businesses struggle to stay afloat and larger businesses make hard decisions to undergo layoffs, there are various industries that have boomed in comparison where hiring has continued as normal. The above considerations around compensation and ability to work remotely are likely dependent on remaining in their current position or finding a new one with similar flexibility to what they may experience now.
    Tech workers are divided on their job security and their ability to find new opportunities during this time. 42% of tech workers were concerned about getting laid off in the next 6 months and, conversely, 58% were not concerned. Only 39% of respondents actually wanted to leave their current job but are concerned about finding a new role.
    Time will tell
    As we navigate this remote-first world, time will tell what the right business decisions are and how companies can be successful during uncertain times. Despite the expectations of tech workers, companies will need to take the lead on how to maintain their businesses, how to continue essential operations, and how to best support their employees. In turn, companies will need to determine how remote work and COVID will impact their salary offerings and their overall compensation philosophy. For now, tech workers will look to companies who are taking a lead in the market to share how salary trends will continue moving forward. More

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    An Employer Brand Expert’s Post-Pandemic Forecast

    Regardless of the extent to which your business has been disrupted by COVID-19, we’ll all re-emerge from varying degrees of lockdown into a changing world. What does this mean for employer brand and its leaders?
    Simon Barrow, creator of employer brand, explores employer brand’s relevancy to a world in the midst of a crisis and massive change, including what employer brand managers must prioritize now in order to thrive.

    Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, or Soundcloud.
    Barrow was a brand manager and advertising CEO before he got the idea to adapt brand management to the more people-centered work of HR. Today, his work in employer brand has had a profound effect on business around the globe. Here’s what lies ahead, in his view, for employer brand managers.
    Your Company Will Be Judged for Its Crisis Response: When asked about the employer brand’s importance right now, Barrow’s answer is blunt: “It’s in times of trouble that it matters most.”
    Transparency Remains Key: Are members of senior management still earning what they were pre-COVID? Are employees being let go at all levels of an organization, or just those lower on the ladder?
    How and Where We Work Will Change: Post-Pandemic: The forced transition to working from home awakened many businesses to the feasibility (and, in some cases, benefits) of a remote workforce, as well as its limits.
    Purpose Will Become All-Important to Employer Brand: Company purpose, Barrow reminds us, is impossible to “spin” when it comes to the employer brand.
    For more from Simon Barrow, listen to his previous appearance on the Employer Branding Podcast and follow his work on LinkedIn. For more help identifying the values and culture you want to create in your company and refining your employer value proposition, reach out to us.

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    Building a Diverse & Inclusive Distributed Workforce

    Companies across all industries have been disrupted in some way due to COVID-19. Talent and recruiting teams have had to navigate the challenges of remote hiring, HR teams have had to work through unique nuances of remote onboarding, and whether your company is hiring or not, this time made way for other strategic projects that […] More

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    How Unilever Integrates Diversity & Inclusion with Employer Brand

    For this consumer goods brand, employer brand and diversity and inclusion aren’t separate initiatives—they work in tandem as vital components of attracting the best employees. Both employer brand and D&I play vital roles in attracting the best employees. Both foreground employee stories, shape company culture and inform its values. As Unilever’s Employer Brand Lead Zakiya […] More

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    Action Beyond the Initiative: Making DE&I Table Stakes at Your Company

    Work toward diversity, equity, and inclusion within the workplace has taken place within companies for many years, from Corporate Social Responsibility to the thought leadership and initiatives for D&I that we know today. Despite that and decades of having these initiatives in place, opportunity gaps continue to exist for women and underrepresented minorities, especially in […] More