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    Disclosing a Disability During Your Job Search

    Searching for a new job can be a stressful, anxiety-inducing process for anyone. If you’re one of the 61 million U.S. adults (26% of the population) who suffers from a disability, a job search can be even more complex and worrisome. Are you legally required to share information about your disability in the first place? […] More

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    Ageism in the Workplace: What it Is and What to Do About It

    In recent years, organizations across all industries have made strides when it comes to building diverse and inclusive teams. In fact, companies are increasingly hiring and promoting employees from historically underrepresented groups, and they’re also extending offers to more and more women, who now make up the bulk of the U.S. workforce. But despite this […] More

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    Combating Pregnancy Discrimination in the Hiring Process

    Three-fourths of American women will carry a pregnancy at least once while employed, according to a recent study. With as many as 64% of Americans looking for or considering a new job, it’s reasonable to assume many women will go through the application and hiring process while pregnant.  One concern of expectant mothers is that […] More

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    Combating Imposter Syndrome

    Have you ever felt like you’re in way over your head in your career? Or maybe read a job description and thought, ‘there’s no way I’m qualified for that’? If so, you may be experiencing imposter syndrome.  Imposter syndrome is the appearance of anxious thoughts and feelings that lead you to believe you’re out of […] More

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    How Recruiters Can Adapt to Major Shifts in Candidate Attitudes

    This past year has greatly altered the dynamics of the U.S. labor market, including job seekers’ expectations of employers, according to a new 2021 Job Seeker Nation Report from Jobvite. It is predicted that many of the changes experienced will be here to stay, bringing about what many believe to be the rise of the optimized workforce. As a result, talent leaders and recruiters must understand how to adjust efforts for the job market today and into the future.
    Remote work & company culture.
    The pandemic has created profound changes in workplace preferences for job seekers, including the desire for remote work. Per the Job Seeker Nation Report, 35% have declined or would decline a job offer that required them to work full time on location, in an office, or at a worksite, and 100% remote work is preferred by 33% of workers.
    Despite an increasing number of employees working remotely, the importance of company culture in applying for a job has continued to rebound. Nearly half of workers believe company culture is very important in their decision to accept or reject a job – a 21% increase since 2019.
    Employers need to implement a hybrid and culture-centric work environment to lure top-quality talent. Likewise, talent leaders must incorporate these company values into the hiring process. This can be accomplished by implementing a cohesive recruitment marketing strategy that includes social media, as more than 33% of job seekers use social media networks to learn about an employer’s culture.
    Diversity hiring is vital.
    With this year prompting many Americans to reflect on what is important to them, it is fitting that those beliefs and priorities are being brought into the job search. This year’s report found a significant number of workers (42%) would turn down a job if the company lacked diversity in its workforce or had no clear goals for improving diversity in hiring.
    Separately, 49% have inquired about employer’s goals and efforts around improving diversity in the workplace during interviews. Based on these results, it’s evident that recruiters need to embrace diversity initiatives, as it significantly influences workers’ decisions to apply, accept, or even reject a job.
    To do this, recruiters must create employment opportunities for all regardless of race, religion, color, gender, identity, age, ability, location, or creed by mitigating challenges in the job-seeking process due to unconscious bias. This can manifest itself in how a job description is written, how a job opening is marketed, what schools an organization recruits candidates from, how a candidate is interviewed, and much more.
    Balance in today’s always-on workforce.
    The majority of surveyed workers report increased stress levels since the onset of the pandemic. In today’s world of competing priorities and unexpected distractions, remote workers are also struggling to transition between “work time” and “home life.” In 2021, 42% of surveyed workers said they are working longer hours compared to the year before.
    Employers must deliver a more thoughtful approach to helping employees achieve a more balanced life based on workers’ individual needs. Talent leaders can then highlight how the company supports its employees through these practices, both now and into the future. This can be delivered through information and videos on the employer’s career site, which continues to be one of the most powerful recruiting assets.
    Interviewing tactics & preferences.
    Here’s the good news for recruiters. Over the past year, an overwhelming majority of surveyed workers consider their most recent candidate experience to be primarily positive. Excellent communication from recruiters, ease of scheduling, and easy job application process were the top reasons for positive candidate experiences.
    A preference for texting is also on the rise. This year’s report found that a majority of job seekers prefer texting for scheduling interviews in comparison to email or phone. This is especially true for workers with children, as 30% are comfortable participating in an interview via texting. Like consumer behavior, candidates have renewed expectations of their job-seeking experience, especially while on a mobile device.
    However, lack of access to adequate technology or Wi-Fi has negatively impacted 35% of job seekers’ ability to participate in a video interview. Recruiters need to consider how this may affect a candidate’s participation and outline strategies to overcome this challenge, as virtual interviews continue to be leveraged in the recruiting process.
    The Rise of the Optimized Workforce.
    The expectations of job seekers and employees have changed forever. As a result, recruiters need a complete understanding of how to adjust efforts to meet the demands of varied realities for today’s workers. To do this, talent leaders must equip themselves with the right skills, knowledge, and strategies to effectively navigate the current reality and engage high-quality talent.
    Kurt Jones is a Senior Manager of Product Marketing at Jobvite, a leading end-to-end talent acquisition suite provider that serves thousands of customers across a wide range of industries.
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    The Hiring Toolkit: How to Use Technology to Drive DEI in Each Stage of Recruiting

    Hidden biases are everywhere—the hiring world being no exception.  As humans, we’re not always capable of recognizing our prejudices in the moment. Fortunately, modern technology is here to fill in that gap: empowering teams to build more equitable talent pipelines and pave pathways for previously overlooked talent.  At Hired, we envision a world where all […] More

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    Why Visual Representations of Diversity Aid an Inclusive Work Environment

    The workplace is where we spend most of our lives. Shouldn’t it, therefore, be a place where we can bring our whole selves to work without the fear of facing discrimination based on our ethnicity, culture, gender, age, or sexual orientation? Shouldn’t the workplace include, celebrate, and represent people from all walks of life? Unfortunately,…
    Why Visual Representations of Diversity Aid an Inclusive Work Environment Undercover Recruiter – More

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    Change, Community, And Career Acceleration: Thermo Fisher Scientific’s Approach To Fostering Diversity

    If you’re like most people coming out of school right now—aka 77 percent of Gen Z students and recent grads—then you’re looking for a company that values diversity and inclusion (D&I). But what does that really mean? Is it as simple as joining a diverse team? What else should you be looking for in a company?
    These are big questions for anyone to be asking, but the team at Thermo Fisher Scientific—a Fortune 200 science company dedicated to making the world healthier, cleaner, and safer—have come up with a few answers. One of the most important is their multiple diverse, global Employee Resource Groups (ERGs).
    So, What Are Employee Resource Groups? How Are They Different At Thermo Fisher?
    If you’ve done a corporate internship or been on the job hunt lately, then maybe you’ve heard about ERGs. They exist to provide additional community and support to specific groups and identities at large companies. For example, a company might have a group based around African Heritage identity or one for employees who served in the military.
    Almost all of these groups put together events like volunteering in the local community and networking sessions, but at Thermo Fisher they take it a step beyond to fully support and foster inclusion amongst all of their colleagues. Their ERGs draw colleagues together around common characteristics and provide a voice of diverse thinking. ERGs positively impact the company’s growth and development, and assist in providing thought leadership for:
    Recruitment and retention
    Education and training
    Professional development
    Community involvement
    Support and recognition
    Business development
    Activities that support a diverse and inclusive work culture
    One way they are supported is through active involvement at the C-level. “At Thermo Fisher we have senior-level leaders at our organization who sponsor and help promote the ERGs,” says Cheryl, a Talent Acquisition D&I leader at Thermo Fisher. “They’re a direct line to executives on how to build more diverse teams and more welcoming communities for everyone.”
    This means when someone has an idea that can help Thermo Fisher be a more inclusive community or build a more diverse team, they can assist and offer their support to make it happen.
    Perhaps someone in the Women’s ERG knows about Women in STEM groups at colleges that could help bring in more female tech talent. Or maybe someone noticed that a cultural event or holiday was going unrecognized by the company. These ERGs give people a platform to not only share their perspectives, but also to have them be heard and acted on.
    Finding Your Community, Bringing Your Whole Self To Work
    The truth about inclusion is that it’s not just a set of policies or practices. It’s about making sure everyone can find community at work so that they feel comfortable enough to be themselves. Besides the obvious benefits for morale and mental health, when people with diverse perspectives feel comfortable bringing their unique ideas to their work, it has a proven, positive impact on the quality of business decision-making.
    “If someone doesn’t feel a sense of inclusion or belonging they may not bring as much of themselves to work,” Cheryl explains. “And we work hard to build a diverse team because we want their unique perspectives.”
    These groups, by creating a community for everyone at Thermo Fisher, can bring out all of those positive benefits, both for the employees and the business. That’s also why the groups aren’t limited to just the traditional understanding of diversity, like ethnicity and gender.
    “Our groups cover a broad spectrum of interests and identities from ethnicity and gender to early talent, sustainability, working parents, and community action,” Cheryl explains. “Our colleagues have formed 10 different ERG groups, with more opportunities to come.”
    All That, Plus They Can Help Accelerate Your Career
    At Thermo Fisher, D&I is a team effort. And that effort can mean opportunities for people at all stages of their career to take on new types of challenges. Plus, thanks to the buy-in from leaders at the company, you’ll be supported in balancing the work of your primary role and your assistance in groups like this.
    That’s why getting involved with ERGs at Thermo Fisher is a win-win. The company benefits from your perspective and action, and you benefit from a more developed network and unique career opportunities.
    One member of the university recruiting team, Emily, noted that, “interns who have been heavily involved in ERGs during their internship are much more likely to receive full-time offers because of all the connections they made during the summer”
    One such success story is Sophia, an emerging leader in the company’s IT Development Program. Her involvement with the Asian and Women’s ERGs as an intern led to leadership opportunities in those groups when she joined back with the company full time.
    “I joined these ERGs as a way to be more engaged and involved in the community,” Sophia says. But when she took on leadership roles in the ERGs, she got way more than just that.
    “This is different from my day job and it exposes me to other functions, too,” Sophia says. ‘It has also been a great way to get my voice heard and network with executive leaders.”
    This type of company-wide idea sharing and collaboration isn’t just what makes D&I initiatives work at Thermo Fisher—it’s what drives the whole business.
    Want to learn more about this uniquely diverse team? Check out open opportunities at Thermo Fisher on WayUp!
    You can also learn about Thermo Fisher Scientific’s ERGs on their website. More