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    Why you should seek accurate salary data to land the salary you deserve

    Discussing salary or going into a salary negotiation conversation can be nerve wrecking for many reasons — and you’re not alone. Some may feel like they lack enough (of the right) data to discuss numbers, while others might not feel confident in the actual words to use when approaching a salary conversation to appear fair while achieving a salary they deserve. Both instances can cause unnecessary anxiety for job seekers, and can prove especially difficult for candidates of underrepresented communities, even though it continues to be the top motivator for tech candidates to look for and accept a new role.
    Leveraging salary data can help empower job seekers to not only ask for the compensation they deserve, but also expect it. In our webinar, “Staying Empowered With Data: Knowing & Asking For The Compensation You Deserve,” I had the opportunity to discuss with our guest speaker, Virgginnia Buccioni-Hillman — an experienced D&I recruiter, HR professional, and DE&I Program Manager at Tile — about why it is important to seek pay equity, how to uncover accurate data sources, and approach salary discussions.
    Empower yourself with accurate salary data
    With a wide variety of resources available online, job seekers must be keen to know where their salary data is coming from. Salary information can be presented as base salary or total compensation, which may include equity, stock options, and bonuses. In addition, salary data can be characterized as employer-reported or self-reported data, the difference being that self-reported data cannot be confirmed by employers. While both types of data sources can be helpful for research purposes, this is what can confuse job seekers and make salary discussions more intimidating and possibly misleading.
    For technical candidates, there are various factors that should be considered when researching salary data and defining a target salary range, including the career field and role you are in or interviewing for, your current city, the location of the prospective role (if it differs from where you live), your core skill-set, and your years of experience (i.e. overall, within a role, coding in a particular language/framework). In her recruiting experience, Buccioni-Hillman shares that this is how different salary bands are developed and how candidates are evaluated for starting salary within the interview funnel.
    Using your research to discuss salary
    On Hired, we encourage a type of salary discussion at the first introduction between a candidate and recruiter to establish a preferred base salary on both ends. While this is not set in stone until a final offer is extended, it elicits a conversation around this early on to ensure there are no surprises or time wasted for both parties. It can also be common for salary discussions to happen as the process approaches an onsite interview.
    Job seekers should invest themselves into the role and team you are interviewing with and lean into these conversations. When asked what your target compensation range is, you can lean on the data you’ve gathered and share your preferred base salary range based on the market research you’ve done. Likewise, Buccioni-Hillman encourages candidates to feel comfortable asking what the base salary range is for the role and level you are interviewing for. By having an open dialogue early on with the recruiter and hiring manager, it can be an ongoing conversation as you proceed through the interview process.
    After doing research into salary data, it is also important to take stock of what is most important to you in a total compensation package, including stock, equity, bonuses, and benefits. Especially in a remote world, examples can include additional vacation time, flexible work schedules, professional development budgets, technology allowances or incorporating a compensation adjustment with a performance review after 6 months and other perks. In an instance of negotiating salary, candidates might shy away from countering to not appear greedy or ungrateful for the opportunity. Companies won’t retract their offer because you would like to negotiate — if anything, they expect you too so don’t be shy. 
    Displaying confidence in your pitch
    If a company has extended a job offer, they believe that you would be a great addition to the team. Displaying gratitude and humility for the opportunity is great but Buccioni-Hillman challenges job seekers to strike a balance between that and ensuring that you aren’t leaving money on the table. Buccioni-Hillman shares that candidates should remember to do the following in salary discussions or negotiations:
    Display confidence in your ability to perform the job successfully
    Focus on the value you can bring to the role and team
    Reiterate your commitment and motivations
    Confidence starts within yourself. When you know your worth, it isn’t boastful to ask for what you are valued. Buccioni-Hillman explains how, while there are systems that may work in favor of some more than others, it shouldn’t stop people from believing in themselves. Gaining visibility and a seat at the table starts with asking for help, gaining mentors, and surrounding yourself with like-minded people that you aspire to be like. While it might feel like it, success doesn’t have to be a lonely road. You can go much further in community with others.
    Additional Resources:
    If you are looking for employer-reported resources and tools to seek accurate salary data, we recommend the following:
    Hired’s Salary Calculator: Discover tech role salaries for specific markets, roles, and years of experience based on real offers extended to candidates by companies on Hired.
    Hired’s 2020 State of Salaries Report: Understand tech role salaries and compensation trends by market, over time, and across different demographic groups, especially in the rapidly changing world we live in today.
    SalaryList: Online tool with real salary data collected from government and companies – annual starting salaries, average salaries, payscale by company, job title, and city. More

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    What Student Job Seekers Really Want from Recruitment Post COVID-19

    A new report reveals how marketing and recruitment processes should be organized to ensure your business is attractive to student job seekers. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, the class of 2020 are facing unprecedented challenges when it comes to trying to secure their place on the career ladder. Debut and the Institute of Student Employers (ISE) came together to survey 2,000 students about what they wanted to find from employers, their attitudes to COVID-19, and how they feel about their career prospects.
    One of the stand-out findings from the report shows that despite the pandemic and all of its challenges, 94% of students are excited to start work, with 42% still confident they will find their dream job upon completion of education.
    A rapidly changing world has led to rapidly changing career paths
    Before the pandemic hit, most students had a solid idea of how they would like their careers to go, including the paths they were going to take to get there. Now, 6 months on from the start of the pandemic, 57% of students say they are changing their ideas around their careers in light of the new challenges. Students are still determined to make the most of the opportunities presented to them though, with 74% still strongly focused on their career path, even if it’s not in the direction they originally thought it would take.
    Fair treatment is the most important factor when choosing a job
    For 98% of young job seekers and students surveyed, receiving fair treatment in the workplace was the most important factor when choosing a job or employer to work for. Being fair to your employees and mindful of the struggles they have faced in this over-competitive job market will go a long way to help them feel valued.
    Many have also stated how they would like to work for an organization that would allow them to ‘have it all’. Simply put they would like to work for an organization that provides a clear career path, work/life balance, interesting work, decent pay, and a strong stance on ethical standards while working alongside like-minded people.
    Communication and the recruitment process
    Students and young job seekers prefer formal methods of communication such as email and LinkedIn to be used when talking to prospective employers about their employment choices, with 95% and 90% respectively, in agreement with these channels. Some students said they would be comfortable with employers communicating with them through blogs (37%), Instagram (36%), Twitter (33%), or Facebook (28%) however most are skeptical about this approach as they feel it encroaches on their more personal platforms. Make sure you’re approachable yet professional in your communication methods with prospective employees, as the wrong type of method could turn them away from your organization.
    During the recruitment process itself, 91% of respondents said they preferred a face-to-face approach, but with the limitations on face-to-face interactions the pandemic has set on people, there is a greater emphasis on calls and video interviews. Luckily 86% said they were comfortable with an online approach where it was necessary, but the main concern was that a third of students don’t trust employers to actually treat them fairly during the recruitment process. We’re all going through a difficult time right now and it’s worth remembering that these students are potentially facing challenges no other generation has done before them, so empathy could go a long way during your recruitment process.
    Job seekers are hungry for information
    When communicating with potential employees, make sure you are providing them with as much information as possible about how to succeed in the recruitment process and what information you’re looking for in applications. Remember, when someone is looking for a job they aren’t just selling themselves to you, you’ve got to sell yourself to them too to make them want to work for you. Providing information on your company’s culture, including testimonials from current employees, career prospects, training, and social opportunities are key things to communicate during the recruitment process.
    Now more than ever though, students and job seekers are interested in what an organization is doing for charities and community work. They are looking for opportunities to get involved in volunteering as part of the positions they are applying for, to help the initiatives throughout the company.
    Excitement and enthusiasm are high despite the challenges
    Overall, despite everything that 2020 has thrown at them, 94% of students are excited to get started in the world of work, with 93% even willing to start remotely if they need to. There seems to be a great understanding amongst students that they need to be flexible and adaptable in the current climate, even if that means starting off their careers at home, getting involved in online inductions, and remote working for now if needed.
    The main worry seems to be focused on finding the opportunities available to them rather than making the most of the opportunities that are presented to them.
    Michele Trusolino is co-founder and chief operating officer of Debut, the student careers app that is revolutionizing the recruitment sector.

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    Knowing What You Want So You Can Find a Job You Love

    Searching for a new job can feel like a daunting task, especially if you weren’t expecting to or have been out of the market for a long time. Before navigating interviews, you may be creating a mental list of things to do including updating your resume, LinkedIn profile, and to start looking at what opportunities are out there. In our recently published ebook, From Layoff to Lift Off: A Comprehensive Guide to Bounce Back in Your Career, we share that the first, and most important, step to start with in your job search is to look within and take stock of what is most important to you in your next opportunity.
    Wants & needs
    Between what profession and life stage you are or will soon be in, your non-negotiables and ‘nice to haves’ can vary from person to person. Starting a job search calls on self-reflection into your top priorities and deal breakers in your next opportunity, which should take place before speaking with a recruiter. The areas that job seekers can begin evaluating include (but are not limited to):
    Finances, such as preferred base salary, bonuses, equity or stock options, and total compensation
    Benefits and perks
    Work-life balance
    Tech stack
    Company size, stage, and industry
    Company culture
    Location, which would include considering if you’re comfortable with and able to commute into an office in a post-COVID world
    As you consider these areas for yourself, understanding what you don’t want is equally important as what you do. Additionally, while it is important to showcase your skills and strengths, being able to identify what you are interested in learning more or growing in, especially with regard to your technical experience, will help you immensely to be able to communicate those desires effectively in your online presence, cover letters, and interviews.
    Empower yourself with data
    Once you have outlined a list of your preferences, requirements, and deal breakers, as a job seeker one of the best things you can do is to empower and equip yourself with data and research into the role(s) you are interested in. You look into the job requirements for the role(s) you’re interested in, compensation offered for the title, level, and market that role is located in, and into the hiring companies, especially as it relates to your list of preferences.
    Information on company size, stage, industry, location, and culture are often easily accessible online, especially on the company’s website, prior to you even applying for open roles. On the other hand, information on compensation, benefits, and perks offered might be a little harder to find unless you’re actively interviewing with that respective company. In these instances, it is especially important to know what you want so you can ask the right questions in your interviews to uncover that information to make the best decision for you. In terms of compensation, while company-specific information may not be readily available, you can equip yourself with market research by using tools such as:
    According to our 2020 State of Wage Inequality Report, the wage gap that exists today is perpetuated by a gap in what candidates actually expect to receive. This is consistent not only between women and men but also across racial groups, age groups, and markets. Since their expectations are lower than their market value, tech workers are asking for less and getting paid less. When you know your value, and it is backed by data, you can go into conversations about compensation more confidently to ask for what you deserve. By analyzing data from multiple resources, you can cross-reference the numbers you find to give you a good idea of a range you deserve for your experience in addition to what you can expect to see for roles you are interviewing for. More

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    Understanding Recruitment: Empowering Job Seekers for Better Interviewing

    Interviewing for a new job can be an emotional and time-consuming process for many, especially in a remote world where home-life and work-life may converge. Feelings of hope and excitement can be mixed with anxiety, frustration, and overwhelm. Although, when you know what to expect as you enter into a job search, your nerves can settle knowing that you prepared as much as you could for the interviewing process. With that, hopefully you can gain that much more confidence and resilience to make it through and find a job that you truly love.
    In our ebook, From Layoff to Lift Off: A Comprehensive Guide to Bounce Back in Your Career, we share tips on how to better understand the recruitment process to improve your interviewing skills and ultimately win at interviewing.
    Understanding recruitment
    Upon review of your application or receiving an interview request, companies will usually have at least 3 steps in their interview process for technical roles. This can include a phone screen with the recruiter, a technical screen, and an onsite interview. In a remote world, companies have taken the opportunity to create a remote interviewing experience that mirrors what it would be like to interview in person, especially for an onsite interview. It is best to practice for phone and video interviews, behavioral questions, how to give a summary of your experience as it relates to the roles you are interviewing for, and gathering your references.
    It is important to note that, while most recruiters and hiring managers work hard to create a stellar candidate experience, they may also be inundated with messages. Upon review by a recruiter, your profile will also need to be reviewed by a hiring manager throughout the process. Because this is a team effort that requires careful consideration by the hiring team, there is time that Don’t be discouraged by automated messages or responses–dealing with a high candidate volume will require understanding and empathy on your part, as well.
    Best practices for follow up
    Being proactive while you interview is a great way to both impress the hiring team and manage your various interview processes. Following up after each interview with a note of gratitude and your next availability will help reiterate your interest and can expedite the scheduling process for your next interview. It works to your benefit to do so within 24 hours after your interview concludes as the discussion is fresh in your mind and you are still fresh in the mind of the interviewer. You can often catch the interviewer within their decision window before they debrief with others on the hiring team.
    If you don’t hear back, don’t count the opportunity out–there could be various reasons for the silence. Prioritize the opportunities you are most interested in and follow up on your initial outreach in a sequence of 3 days, 4 days, then 4 days (not including weekends). As long as you lead with kindness and focus on your conversations with the individual you are reaching out to, instead of pitching yourself as a candidate, it can be a productive and positive signal to the team that you are still interested without seeming too pushy. More

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    How to Hire a Data Engineer

    Data Engineering is one of the fastest-growing job roles in the tech industry with LinkedIn Talent Insights categorizing demand for these roles as ‘very high’. This means that it’s harder than ever for firms to attract and retain talent in this pivotal role. Estimates on the number of unfilled positions last year range from as much as 33-50%.
    One of the reasons for the shortage is the rate at which the discipline is moving, with tools and technologies emerging and evolving rapidly. This leads to the absence of a standardized toolset and means that the definition of the role can be dramatically different across companies.
    Based on research with 50 Data Engineers, and in conversation with Dani Solà Lagares (Director of Data at Simply Business) research from technology recruiting firm Stott and May reveals what Data Engineers are looking for, and what potential employers can be doing to increase their chances of snagging top talent. Here are the four top tips to come out of the research.
    1. Give them a clearly defined role.
    When looking for a new role, Data Engineers need to see a detailed and realistic job description. 72% testified that this was the most important factor in whether or not they will apply. If an employer doesn’t have this nailed down, then Data Engineers will pass up the opportunity in favor of an employer who has a clear idea of what needs to be done. ‘Give candidates a sense of the projects they will be working on and the stakeholders they will be engaging with,’ says Dani Sola. ‘Even more importantly, provide some narrative on the type of impact you expect key initiatives to make.’
    2. Provide the right technology stack.
    48% of Data Engineers stated that the technology stack they will be working with is the most important consideration in accepting a role. Because the technology stack has so much to do with what their day-to-day work will look like, it’s important that the fit is right. ‘Technical skillsets could vary dramatically from Kafka, Kafka Streams, Scala, Kotlin knowledge, advanced SQL, data warehousing skills, Python, the list goes on,’ says Dani. ‘It is important, however, to paint a picture of your requirements without asking candidates to tick every skillset that’s ever existed in data engineering.’
    3. Benchmark to ensure you’re offering a competitive salary.
    According to the research, 42% of Data Engineers say they are most likely to jump ship because their salary and benefits are below market rate. It’s important to make sure you are benchmarking your salaries against your competitors, and offering a competitive compensation package if you want to retain in-demand talent. ‘In my view, one of the major reasons engineers move on is that the initial value proposition of the role in that organization has not lived up to expectations,’ says Dani. ‘Don’t sell a dream and deliver a nightmare. If you’re authentic and invest in your team’s personal development that can go a long way.’
    4. Don’t wear them out with excessive interview steps.
    Data Engineers’ time is very important, so if they are being asked to jump through too many hoops, they are liable to simply look elsewhere. If you’re looking to recruit a Data Engineer, try to streamline the recruitment process as much as possible so that you can make an assessment of their fit without losing momentum. ‘Keep talent engaged during the hiring process,’ says Dani. ‘Create a sense of your culture and values. Make great first impressions as a potential employer. Interviewing should be about making the candidate feel at ease and creating an environment where they can show themselves at their best.’
    David Struth is Head of Marketing at Stott and May.

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    A-Players Sourcing Guide: 11 Steps to Landing the Industry’s Top-Performers

    The most talented people build the best companies. It’s that simple. No successful business was built purely on market fit and a ton of investments. People are the #1 asset of any company, its biggest strength or weakness. The concentration of talent per square foot determines the chances for a business to skyrocket. That’s why having as many A-Players in a team as possible is crucial for any company.
    Who are A-Players, and why are they so valuable?

    An A-Player is an employee who has a 90% chance of performing in the top 10%.

    Brad & Geoff Smart
    A-Players bring an ownership mindset, self-awareness, intellect, depth, and curiosity to any organization. An A-Player is someone who would be enthusiastically rehired by previous employers. But the chances to find and hire one are slim: they comprise only up to 10% of the labor market in their industry. For an amateur to find an A-Player is a matter of luck, but for a professional sourcer, it’s a result of a defined strategy.
    The reality is that your team most likely consists of a mix of A, B, and C-players. But is it possible to create a team where 90% of staff are A-Players? Sounds like a daring dream, but applying the right sourcing strategy, it’s achievable. I would like to share an 11-step guide on how to do it properly.
    Step 1. Develop and customize a sourcing strategy for every role
    Create and share with the team a document with a sourcing strategy for every role. It should contain:
    a job description,
    Q&A and keywords for the role,
    a list of target companies, meetups, and organizations,
    search strings,
    possible role titles,
    useful search hints.
    Describe the steps you take to source potential candidates, but customize it for every individual case. Don’t let this document just sit there. Keep brainstorming with your team on new sources and add updated information.
    Step 2. Start your research before meeting a client or hiring manager
    Start working on the position before meeting the client or hiring manager. Study the job description and define gaps to ask the person in charge. Thoroughly research the tech stack. Tools like GlossaryTech will be beneficial for this purpose. Find 3-5 relevant candidates to calibrate your search better, and ask for feedback on them from the client. Prepare a list of questions and draft a plan for the meeting. It will help you have a fruitful conversation instead of just nodding along and returning with more and more questions afterward.
    Step 3. Schedule an intake meeting with the client or hiring manager
    After doing background research, schedule an intake meeting with hiring managers and decision-makers in the company. Ask all kinds of questions, starting from basic (job location, requirements, perfect candidate profiles, companies to source from) to advanced ones (value to a candidate, culture uniqueness, expected outcomes for a new employee). It’s your chance to clarify any confusion, so don’t hesitate to do so. Also, discuss profiles you have sourced for the meeting. A good tip would also be to ask a client or hiring manager how they would describe themself if they were looking for the job in question. It’s a great way to gather relevant keywords and get a sense of the natural language used by candidates.
    Step 4. Identify an A-Player
    A-Players can be identified by several markers, described below. Of course, not everyone can create a perfect LinkedIn profile or describe their strongest features. Most A-Players don’t even identify themselves as such. That’s why I recommend reaching out to any candidates who meet two or more of the criteria listed below.
    Product-focused description in their profile. A-Players don’t just list technologies they work with but point out their impact and contribution to the business.
    Entrepreneurship experience. Starting a company requires a healthy ownership mindset, self-motivation, and self-organization. People who started their own companies understand how business works as a whole and will be a good fit, no matter their business outcomes.
    Current or recent employers that hire top performers. With experience, you’ll get a sense of companies that have high hiring standards. Keep track of them on the list, and you’ll get a database of companies you can source from.
    Promotions. A-Players are performance-driven, motivated, innovative, and effective. They believe in self-development and maintain exceptionally high expectations of themselves and others. Hence, they are more likely to be promoted within a company.
    Three recent employments lasted at least 1,5 years. A-Players must make an impact within a company, and it always takes time. Also, their time commitment to an employer shows that they choose companies with a clear mission and vision, a problem-solving product, and values that coincide with their own.
    Open source experience. An innate need drives the growth of top performers. They have at least one area of expertise they know profoundly and share their knowledge.
    Good references. Top-performers love what they do and make an exponential impact on the business and the team. They also know how to build and keep relationships and are likely to receive good references from their employers and colleagues.
    Volunteer or mentorship experience. A-Players are interested in the success of the group more than their own. Volunteer or mentorship experience is a good indicator of a proactive community-oriented person who will sacrifice their own time or benefit for the success of a team.
    Step 5. Brainstorm sourcing ideas
    Create lists of target Companies, Schools, Meetups, and Organizations to source from and update them every day. Having a ready-to-go list will dramatically speed up the search process. You could use Owler, Google Search, or tech companies guides to identify target companies. A good lifehack: check-out relevant conferences and their sponsors who are usually companies interested in a particular industry.
    Step 6. Make a list of relevant keywords
    Compose a list of keywords based on a job description, intake meeting, and surface research. Make sure to include technologies, tools, and natural language phrases. Pay attention to specific words that the candidates use to describe themselves. Come up with as many variations and descriptions as you can, using tools like GlossaryTech or a thesaurus.
    For example, to find a candidate who has participated in some coding challenge and won, the list of keywords would include (programming OR coding) AND (competition OR challenge OR contest OR hackathon) AND (won OR selected OR achieved). Avoid general phrases like self-motivated or competent team players that stand for nothing in particular.
    Step 7. Check your database
    Start your search with the list of former candidates who were among the finalists for past openings but weren’t selected or responsive. Those second-runners, also known as silver and bronze medalists, may have grown enough to be a good fit now. They also may be ready for a change and be more likely to engage this time. Come up with an idea of how to re-engage them. It’s always better to send a message with an update about a company and its product, an invitation for a meetup, or to congratulate the candidate on an achievement. Don’t reach out to those warm contacts out of the blue. Make your message personalized based on the information you already know about the candidate.
    Step 8. Stretch your search to alternative channels
    Now, when you have all the necessary information, you can start your search. Don’t limit yourself to traditional channels like LinkedIn, GitHub, Google, etc. To advance your sourcing strategy and find unique information about a candidate, go further and include social media, articles, and personal websites. You can also use professional tools like TurboHiring or AmazingHiring that provide necessary resources and contacts.
    Information from alternative channels will help you personalize your outreach messages and demonstrate that you genuinely care about the candidate. People appreciate it when recruiters research before sending a message and provide essential points on why the offer would be a perfect match.
    Step 9. Outreach smart
    Compose messages in advance. Prepare one note and two follow-ups to send to a candidate. Be assertive but not annoying. Check your writing using tools like Главред (for Russian) and Grammarly (for English). Don’t trust only your own eyes in this case. Those tools will identify possible mistakes and help you compose a stylistically correct message. They will prevent you from awkward typos that may ruin a connection with a candidate.
    Remember to follow-up. Don’t rely on your memory for that. Set a reminder to write back to the candidate or use an email automation tool like Yesware. It will not only follow-up with non-responsive candidates but will track open and reply rates. This information will be useful when measuring your results.
    Outreach through different channels. Don’t limit yourself to one channel. LinkedIn connection and InMail are reliable alternatives to reach out to a candidate.
    Test your message. Write a couple of variations of the same message, and A/B test them. By measuring and comparing the response rates, you will identify the most effective one and can increase the overall rate in the future.
    Step 10. Source continuously
    The best practice is to create your database of potential A-Players and update it is as soon as you spot a top-performer. Keep looking for A-Players even if you currently don’t have an opening. Because when you do, it will be easier to have a ready pool of talented people and pull relevant ones out of it. To make this internal search faster, mark your candidates as you add them with appropriate tags (e.g., #python, #marketing)
    Step 11. Measure your results
    Measuring your results will help you identify the most effective strategy and, if needed, provide a report about the work done to the client or hiring manager. It’s also useful to reflect on your performance to know how you can improve. Here are a few metrics to keep track of:
    the number of sourced candidates
    open and reply rates
    contact to interest ratio
    interviewed to introduced to a client ratio
    interviewed to hire ratio
    Consider only metrics relevant to your initial inquiry and goal. To determine them, ask yourself what you would like to measure why you need to know it, and how to do it.
    Finding and hiring an A-Player is like mining for gold: it looks like a matter of luck but is, in fact, a guaranteed result if you know where and how to look for it. Following the steps described above and adjusting them to your particular case will result in an A-Player hire. It may seem like a tedious process on the surface, but this strategy saves a lot of time and will increase your effectiveness in the long-term.
    Sourcing A-Players isn’t just about bringing the most experienced people on board. It’s about finding someone who has high standards of work and performance, a sense of ownership, clear values, flexible and critical thinking, curiosity, and a passion for what they do. The quality of the people in the team determines an organization’s capacity to deliver extraordinary value and exceed customers’ expectations.
    Kate Hotsyk is an A-Players Talent Sourcer with more than five years of experience in talent acquisition for start-ups and fast-growing environments. More information at aplayersrecruiting.com.

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    Why the US Suspension of Foreign Work Permits is Good News for UK Companies

    As the legalities of employment in the US continue to evolve, the conviction that the future of work will be remote becomes stronger.
    In June, the US President decided to halt access to several employment-based visas, including H-1B visas for high-skill workers. This decision was quickly slammed by leading US tech companies, including Google, Twitter, and Tesla.
    Indeed, many organizations depend heavily on H-1B visas to recruit a diverse pool of high-skill talent from abroad. Without access to those visas, companies must look beyond their borders for the talent they need as they simply cannot compete in a globalized market without access to global workers.
    Documents such as green cards and work visas make it possible for businesses of all sizes to look beyond their local talent pools. Without H-1B visas, companies (especially those in industries with talent shortages, i.e tech) will suffer. However, these jobs will not simply disappear. Companies will still hire the talent they need – just not in the US.
    With the availability and acceptance of remote work opportunities growing, this latest decision presents a great opportunity for businesses from across the globe. They are now in a unique position to access a wider pool of talents than ever before while breaking free from governments’ regulations. This could be the chance for companies who are facing a shortage of skills, an issue particularly prevalent in the UK, to recruit candidates with the relevant skills.
    A chance for the UK to solve its digital skills shortage
    While the UK employment market remains resilient despite the uncertainties brought by the Covid-19 crisis, UK businesses continue to face a talent shortage, especially in the tech sector.
    In a recent report, The Open University found that up to nine in ten organizations are facing a shortage of digital skills, which has a direct impact on their productivity, efficiency, and competitiveness. Stats from the IET concur with this finding: in 2019, more than half of UK engineering and technology companies said they believe a shortage of engineers threatens their business.
    There are now hundreds of people, with in-demand digital skills, who have been affected by the new US policy. This means that more candidates are now available to fill the thousands of open vacancies within the UK tech sector crying out for skilled talent. UK companies seeking specialist talent should ensure they are among the first in line to attract them.
    By recruiting candidates affected by the latest change in the US, UK companies have a chance to shrink the digital skills gap they currently face.
    The question is how?
    The opportunity is massive yet recruiting and bringing foreign talent into the country can be cumbersome. Currently, UK companies looking to employ foreign talent must meet various requirements depending on candidates’ nationalities, skill sets, and contract lengths, in addition to holding a sponsor license.
    This can be difficult, especially for start-ups or small businesses without the necessary resources to carry out this process. Until recently, many large US companies offered support for visa applications as a perk to speed up the process of bringing talent from abroad into the country, locking out smaller companies and international organizations.
    To compete, the UK has established a series of visa schemes to attract foreign tech talent, such as the Tech Nation Global Talent Visa and the Start-up Visa. However, for UK companies who want to take advantage of the opportunities brought by the recent changes to the US visa system, a more immediate solution exists.
    The opportunities of global remote work
    By turning to global remote employment, UK companies can act quickly to recruit talent from anywhere in the world, bypassing the need for visas altogether. Self-serve platforms for global employment enable companies to recruit knowledge workers independent of their locations.
    Technology can now entirely manage global payroll, benefits, compliance, and taxes on behalf of companies, freeing them from the administrative burden of global talent management. Remote work offers opportunities to employees no matter where they live, allowing businesses to hire the best talent regardless of location.
    There is no doubt that other companies, especially in the US, will also jump on the remote working bandwagon to remain attractive among high-skilled workers. UK businesses should, therefore, seize this opportunity as quickly as possible and ensure remote positions are readily available to a wide range of talent.
    By doing so, they will be able to compete with other companies, not only within the country but from across the globe, for a chance to close their digital skills gap.
    By Job van der Voort, CEO and co-founder of Remote.

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